Clinton and Obama 'hug it out'

Last updated 16:41 14/08/2014

Former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton denies friction with President Barack Obama, says they "agree" on foreign policy. Vanessa Johnston reports.

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They may or may not have hugged, but President Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton rubbed shoulders on at a party on Martha's Vineyard after the former secretary of state criticised the foreign policy vision of her one-time boss.

Clinton called Obama this week to say that her comments to Jeffrey Goldberg, a writer for the Atlantic magazine, were not meant as an attack on the president. In the Atlantic interview, published on Sunday, Clinton described US policy in Syria as a failure and said Obama's doctrine of "'don't do stupid stuff' was not an organising principle" for a great nation.

Her spokesman said Clinton, a potential 2016 presidential candidate, looked forward to "hugging it out" with Obama when the two attended the party put on by mutual friend and Washington power broker Vernon Jordan on the Massachusetts island, where the Obamas are vacationing.

Clinton was on the island to promote her book, Hard Choices, a memoir of her time as the nation's top diplomat under Obama, who picked her for the post after besting her for the Democratic presidential nomination in 2008.

Speaking to reporters before signing books on, Clinton said she was "absolutely" looking forward to hugging it out with the president and said they both were committed to US values and security interests.

"We have disagreements as any partners and friends, as we are, might very well have," Clinton said.

"But I'm proud... that I served with him and for him, and I'm looking forward to seeing him tonight."

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- Reuters

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