Model plane bombing planner guilty

ROS KRASNY
Last updated 08:05 11/07/2012
Model Plane
Reuters
GROUNDED: A scale model of a US Navy F86 Sabre fighter plane intended to be used in a terrorist bombing in the US.
Model Plane
Reuters
GROUNDED: A scale model of a US Navy F4 Phantom fighter plane intended to be used in a terrorist bombing in the US.

Relevant offers

Americas

Voting is important, but is it more important than other civil rights? With Donald Trump, what you see is not only what you get; it's also all you get Amid escalating Russia crisis, US President Donald Trump considers major staff changes Two US men stabbed to death on train trying to stop anti-Muslim rant Why the FBI is interested in Jared Kushner's meetings with Russians US President Donald Trump calls first trip abroad 'home run' as challenges await Danielle McLaughlin: Healthcare nightmare could end in socialist pipedream What if Donald Trump pulls US from climate deal? Doesn't look good for Earth Barack Obama offers condolences to Manchester victims in Prince Harry meeting Man hurling racial slurs allegedly kills two, injures one on a US train

A Massachusetts man charged with plotting to attack the Pentagon and the US Capitol with large, remote-controlled model airplanes packed with explosives has agreed to plead guilty.

Prosecutors and defence attorneys have agreed to request a 17-year sentence for Rezwan Ferdaus on charges that he attempted to damage and destroy a federal building, and attempted to provide material support to terrorists.

Ferdaus, 26, of Ashland, Massachusetts, earlier pleaded not guilty to a total of six charges after his arrest in September 2011 after an undercover FBI investigation.

In exchange for the guilty plea, the government will dismiss the remaining charges.

A US citizen and a physics graduate from Northeastern University, Ferdaus was arrested after an FBI investigation during which he requested and took delivery of explosives, three grenades and six assault rifles from undercover FBI agents.

At the time of his arrest, Ferdaus had obtained one remote-controlled aircraft, a scale model of a US Navy F-86 Sabre fighter jet about the size of a picnic table, which he kept in a storage locker rented under a false name.

Authorities said the public was never in danger from the explosives and weapons, which they said were always under the control of federal officials during the sting operation.

The government had previously alleged that Ferdaus told undercover agents of his plans to commit acts of violence against the United States by decapitating its "military centre" and killing "kafirs", an Arabic term meaning non-believers.

In 2010, already under surveillance, Ferdaus allegedly supplied 12 mobile phones rigged as electrical switches for improvised explosive devices to FBI agents whom he believed to be members of or recruiters for al Qaeda.

Ferdaus' attorneys suggested during a bail hearing in November that their client had mental health issues, and that his attack plan was "fantasy".

Ad Feedback

- Reuters

Special offers

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content