Drought takes hold on US

JIM SUHR
Last updated 08:00 17/07/2012

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The drought gripping the United States is the widest since 1956, according to new data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Fifty-five per cent of the continental US was in a moderate-to-extreme drought by the end of June, NOAA's National Climactic Data Center in Asheville, North Carolina, said in its monthly State of the Climate drought report. That's the largest percentage since December 1956, when 58 per cent of America was covered by drought.

This summer, 80 per cent of the US is abnormally dry, and the report said the drought expanded in the West, Great Plains and Midwest last month with the 14th warmest and 10th driest June on record.

America's corn and soybean belt has been hit especially hard over the past three months, the report said. That region has experienced its seventh warmest and 10th driest April-to-June period.

"Topsoil has dried out and crops, pastures and rangeland have deteriorated at a rate rarely seen in the last 18 years," the report said.

The report is based on a data set going back to 1895 called the Palmer Drought Index, which feeds into the widely watched and more detailed US Drought Monitor. It reported last week that 61 per cent of the continental

US was in a moderate-to-exceptional drought. However, the weekly Drought Monitor goes back only 12 years, so climatologists use the Palmer Drought Index for comparing droughts before 2000.

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- AP

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