Student activist found after disappearance

Last updated 16:29 26/09/2012

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An activist with Mexico's student movement who had been reported missing last week was found alive and well in a neighboring state, prosecutors reported Tuesday.

Aleph Jimenez Dominguez acted as a local spokesman for the movement called ''I Am 132'' in Ensenada, in Baja California state before he went missing September 20.

The student movement sprang up before the July 1 presidential elections to oppose alleged campaign violations and the return of the old ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party.

Baja California state prosecutor's spokesman Victor Garcia said Tuesday that Jimenez Dominguez had been found in the neighboring state of Baja California Sur, but didn't provide further details.

State prosecutor Rommel Moreno said ''the investigation remains open. We are going to wait until the young man makes a statement to get more details.''

The movement had voiced fears he could have been abducted in retaliation for his political activism.

Moreno said the state is offering protection and counseling to the man and his family as needed.

Late Tuesday, the governmental National Human Rights Commission said Jimenez Dominguez had travelled to Mexico City Tuesday to file a complaint alleging his rights had been violated.

The commission's statement did not specify who was accused in the complaint, but the commission is only mandated to investigate rights violations committed by public servants, police, military personnel and other government employees.

The commission said it was investigating the complaint, and said it ''rejects any act of intimidation against any human rights activist, given that it constitutes an attack on the country's democratic life.''

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- AP

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