Hugo Chavez dies after cancer battle

Chavez hugs his daughters Rosa and Maria while appearing to supporters on a balcony of Miraflores Palace soon after his return to the country from Cuba.
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Chavez hugs his daughters Rosa and Maria while appearing to supporters on a balcony of Miraflores Palace soon after his return to the country from Cuba.
Venezuela's Vice President Nicolas Maduro salutes after announcing the death of the president.
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Venezuela's Vice President Nicolas Maduro salutes after announcing the death of the president.
Thousands took to the streets all over Venezuela in mourning.
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Thousands took to the streets all over Venezuela in mourning.
Chavez takes part in an ecumenic ceremony to pray for his health and cancer treatment at Miraflores Palace in Caracas in this August 21, 2011.
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Chavez takes part in an ecumenic ceremony to pray for his health and cancer treatment at Miraflores Palace in Caracas in this August 21, 2011.
Chavez runs during a friendly softball game, between teams comprising Venezuelan MLB players, retired veterans and government staff, in Caracas.
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Chavez runs during a friendly softball game, between teams comprising Venezuelan MLB players, retired veterans and government staff, in Caracas.
Hugo Chavez addresses the 61st General Assembly of the United Nations in 2006.
6 of 15RAY STUBBLEBINE/ Reuters
Hugo Chavez addresses the 61st General Assembly of the United Nations in 2006.
News of Chavez's death was met with a massive outpouring of grief.
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News of Chavez's death was met with a massive outpouring of grief.
US President Barack Obama greets his Venezuelan counterpart Hugo Chavez in April 2009.
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US President Barack Obama greets his Venezuelan counterpart Hugo Chavez in April 2009.
Hugo Chavez smiles from a hospital bed in February, accompanied by his daughters Maria and Rosa.
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Hugo Chavez smiles from a hospital bed in February, accompanied by his daughters Maria and Rosa.
Hugo Chavez shows the pistols of independence hero Simon Bolivar at his birthday in July, 2012.
10 of 15CARLOS GARCIA RAWLINS/ Reuters
Hugo Chavez shows the pistols of independence hero Simon Bolivar at his birthday in July, 2012.
Supporters of Hugo Chavaz gather in mourning at Caracas.
11 of 15JORGE SILVA/ Reuters
Supporters of Hugo Chavaz gather in mourning at Caracas.
Hugo Chavez holds a Russian Kalashnikov assault rifle AK-103 next to Defense Minister Orlando Maniglia during a Venezuelan army expo in 2006.
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Hugo Chavez holds a Russian Kalashnikov assault rifle AK-103 next to Defense Minister Orlando Maniglia during a Venezuelan army expo in 2006.
A supporter of Venezualan President Hugo Chavez kisses another supporter wearing a mask depicting him in February, this year.
13 of 15CARLOS GARCIA RAWLINS/ Reuters
A supporter of Venezualan President Hugo Chavez kisses another supporter wearing a mask depicting him in February, this year.
Hugo Chavez visits Cuban leader Fidel Castro in Havana in 2006.
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Hugo Chavez visits Cuban leader Fidel Castro in Havana in 2006.
Hugo Chavez pictured as a young man; first during his school years in his hometown Barinas, second as second lieutenant at the Military Academy in Caracas and third during his imprisonment at Yare Prison in 1992-94.
15 of 15Reuters
Hugo Chavez pictured as a young man; first during his school years in his hometown Barinas, second as second lieutenant at the Military Academy in Caracas and third during his imprisonment at Yare Prison in 1992-94.

Hundreds of anguished Venezuelans have poured into the streets of downtown Caracas crying, hugging each other and shouting slogans in support of President Hugo Chavez after learning of his death.

Fifty-eight-year-old Chavez, the fiery populist who declared a socialist revolution in Venezuela, crusaded against US influence and championed a leftist revival across Latin America, had been ill for nearly two-years with cancer.

Clusters of women with tears streaming down their faces clung to each other and wept near the Miraflores presidential palace.

Some wore T-shirts with slogans that read ''Go forward commander!''

Nearby, men with grim and somber faces pumped their arms in the air while shouting ''Long live Chavez! Long live Chavismo!''

''I feel such big pain I can't even speak,'' said Yamilina Barrios, a 39-year-old office worker weeping at a street corner.

''He was the best thing the country had ... I adore him. Let's hope the country calms down and we can continue the tasks he left us.''  

Many people left work and rushed home as shops and offices began to close early and tension gripped the streets in Caracas, capital of a country deeply divided by the socialist programs pursued by the charismatic Chavez.

The news of his death was announced by the country's Vice President Nicolas Maduro on national television.

During more than 14 years in office, Chavez routinely challenged the status quo at home and internationally.

He polarized Venezuelans with his confrontational and domineering style, yet was also a masterful communicator and strategist who tapped into Venezuelan nationalism to win broad support, particularly among the poor.

Chavez repeatedly proved himself a political survivor.

As an army paratroop commander, he led a failed coup in 1992, then was pardoned and elected president in 1998.

 He survived a coup against his own presidency in 2002 and won re-election two more times.

The burly president electrified crowds with his booming voice, often wearing the bright red of his United Socialist Party of Venezuela or the fatigues and red beret of his army days.

Before his struggle with cancer, he appeared on television almost daily, talking for hours at a time and often breaking into song of philosophical discourse.

Chavez used his country's vast oil wealth to launch social programs that include state-run food markets, new public housing, free health clinics and education programmes.

Poverty declined during Chavez's presidency amid a historic boom in oil earnings, but critics said he failed to use the windfall of hundreds of billions of dollars to develop the country's economy.

Inflation soared and the homicide rate rose to among the highest in the world.

Chavez underwent surgery in Cuba in June 2011 to remove what he said was a baseball-size tumour from his pelvic region, and the cancer returned repeatedly over the next 18 months despite more surgery, chemotherapy and radiation treatments.

 He kept secret key details of his illness, including the type of cancer and the precise location of the tumours.

"El Comandante," as he was known, stayed in touch with the Venezuelan people during his treatment via Twitter and phone calls broadcast on television, but even those messages dropped off as his health deteriorated.

Two months after his last re-election in October, Chavez returned to Cuba again for cancer surgery, blowing a kiss to his country as he boarded the plane. He was never seen again in public.

After a 10-week absence marked by opposition protests over the lack of information about the president's health and growing unease among the president's "Chavista" supporters, the government released photographs of Chavez on February 15 and three days later announced that the president had returned to Venezuela to be treated at a military hospital in Caracas.

Throughout his presidency, Chavez said he hoped to fulfil Bolivar's unrealized dream of uniting South America.

He was also inspired by Cuban leader Fidel Castro and took on the aging revolutionary's role as Washington's chief antagonist in the Western Hemisphere after Castro relinquished the presidency to his brother Raul in 2006.

Supporters saw Chavez as the latest in a colourful line of revolutionary legends, from Castro to Argentine-born Ernesto "Che" Guevara.

Chavez nurtured that cult of personality, and even as he stayed out of sight for long stretches fighting cancer, his out-sized image appeared on buildings and billboard throughout Venezuela.

The airwaves boomed with his baritone mantra: "I am a nation." Supporters carried posters and wore masks of his eyes, chanting, "I am Chavez."

Chavez saw himself as a revolutionary and saviour of the poor.

"A revolution has arrived here," he declared in a 2009 speech. "No one can stop this revolution."

Chavez's social programmes won him enduring support: Poverty rates declined from 50 percent at the beginning of his term in 1999 to 32 percent in the second half of 2011.

But he also charmed his audience with sheer charisma and a flair for drama that played well for the cameras.

He ordered the sword of South American independence leader Simon Bolivar removed from Argentina's Central Bank to unsheathe at key moments.

On television, he would lambast his opponents as "oligarchs," announce expropriations of companies and lecture Venezuelans about the glories of socialism.

His performances included renditions of folk songs and impromptu odes to Chinese revolutionary Mao Zedong and 19th century philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche.

Chavez carried his in-your-face style to the world stage as well.

In a 2006 speech to the UN General Assembly, he called President George W Bush the devil, saying the podium reeked of sulphur after Bush's address.

Critics saw Chavez as a typical Latin American caudillo, a strongman who ruled through force of personality and showed disdain for democratic rules.

Chavez concentrated power in his hands with allies who dominated the congress and justices who controlled the Supreme Court.

He insisted all the while that Venezuela remained a vibrant democracy and denied trying to restrict free speech. But some opponents faced criminal charges and were driven into exile.

While Chavez trumpeted plans for communes and an egalitarian society, his soaring rhetoric regularly conflicted with reality.

Despite government seizures of companies and farmland, the balance between Venezuela's public and private sectors changed little during his presidency.

And even as the poor saw their incomes rise, those gains were blunted while the country's currency weakened amid economic controls.

Nonetheless, Chavez maintained a core of supporters who stayed loyal to their "comandante" until the end.

HUGO CHAVEZ: The 58-year-old has ruled Venezuela for 14 years.
HUGO CHAVEZ: The 58-year-old has ruled Venezuela for 14 years.
MOURNING: Supporters of Venezuela's President Hugo Chavez took to the streets in Caracas after news of his death was announced.
MOURNING: Supporters of Venezuela's President Hugo Chavez took to the streets in Caracas after news of his death was announced.

AP