North Korea's photo flaws laid bare ... again

Last updated 09:14 28/03/2013
North Korea
Reuters

BOOSTING THE NUMBERS: An official photograph from North Korea shows eight hovercraft whizzing towards a beach. However the two circled craft appear to have been copied.

Hovercraft
Reuters
AWOL: Only six hovercraft are seen in this photo, in spite of eight pictured heading for shore earlier.
North Korea
Reuters
LOOK FAMILIAR?: The photo of the first two hovercraft heading toward land appears to show identical patterns of surf. Parts of the background have also been crudely erased.

Related Links

Chinese officials hover

Relevant offers

Americas

Saudi airman gets 35 years to life for raping boy in Las Vegas New Iran UN envoy appointee expected to get US visa -sources Romney speech attacks rival Clinton Denver airport bans pot merchandise Charles Townes, physicist who invented the laser, dies at 99 US Supreme Court blocks three Oklahoma executions Zombie or miracle, Florida cat claws his way back from the dead Magnitude 5.7 quake hits off northern California coast - USGS Ex-Los Alamos scientist jailed in nuclear espionage case 'Murky' prosecutor killing conspiracy grips Argentina

North Korea has been caught out in yet another Photoshop gaffe, this time doctoring a picture of a hovercraft landing by adding extra hovercraft.

The photo has made headlines throughout international media and shows several hovercraft coming ashore at an undisclosed location on North Korea's east coast on Tuesday (local time).

According to a number of world news agencies, including The Guardian and The Atlantic, evidence of Photoshopping is visible through the lack of a wake on one of the boats and clearly missing pixels on another.

Both the United States and South Korea have been carrying out controversial joint military exercises in that region.

In North Korea's attempt to look more menacing, a couple of dozen troops of the Korean people's army and navy can be seen running ahead of one of the hovercraft.

It is thought soldiers positioned behind a bank at the edge of the beach would be waiting to propel them back.

Writing for The Atlantic, Alan Taylor picked up that several of the craft appeared to be digital replicas of others and had possibly just been copied and pasted elsewhere.

It's not the first time North Korea has had their digital cover blown. At the state funeral of Kim Jong-Il, it was revealed a number of people who didn't appear to be intently focused on the dear leader were cut straight out of official photographs.

The touch up was only noticed because Japanese agency Kyodo News took their own photo at almost the exact same moment, showing the group of people quite clearly there

Ad Feedback

- Stuff

Special offers

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content