Man buried after lightning hits him four times

STACEY KIRK
Last updated 16:23 28/03/2013
Alexander Mandon
A CURE?: Village doctors buried Alexander Mandon after he was struck by lightning four time since September.

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They say lightning never strikes in the same place twice, but one Colombian man, who has been struck four times and then buried alive, is living proof that is occasionally it does. 

Alexander Mandon, 20, from a small Colombian village called Sampués, has been struck by lightning four times since September.

Bizarrely, although steeped in some logic, village doctors said the cure to his affliction would be to ground him by burying him neck deep in the earth. 

They said by grounding him, the electrical charge would be stripped away from his body.

The Huffington Post said it is the second time Mandon has been buried, because the first time he was not put in the correct upright position. 

Colombian news agency Colombia Reports said Mandon had to be discharged from the army because it was believed he was positively charged to attract lightning. 

The commander of the unit was reportedly concerned by Mandon's electric charge and decided to avoid the risk of electrocution by firing the soldier.

Mandon was sent home to Sampues, in the northern Sucre department, where it was thought he could avoid perilous lightning shocks because of low rainfall in the region. But he attracted another lightning bolt.

It is unclear whether the second burial was successful, but Mandon was reportedly staying away from windows and doors.

Lightning strikes can contain more than 100,000 volts of electricity. While they can cause heart attacks and stroke in victims, survival from a strike more likely than death.

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