Snowden's father rails at Congress, Obama

SUSAN HEAVEY AND TABASSUM ZAKARIA
Last updated 06:43 27/07/2013

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The father of fugitive US spy agency contractor Edward Snowden today criticised Congress for failing to rein in a sweeping surveillance program made public by his son and accused the Obama administration of pursuing him with a "zeal to punish."

Lonnie Snowden has not had direct communication with his son since he fled to Hong Kong and then Russia, but sent a letter to President Barack Obama today defending his son's actions as similar to acts of civil disobedience.

"We thus find your administration's zeal to punish Mr Snowden's discharge of civic duty to protect democratic processes and to safeguard liberty to be unconscionable and indefensible," the letter to Obama said.

"We are also appalled at your administration's scorn for due process, the rule of law, fairness, and the presumption of innocence as regards Edward," he wrote in the letter posted on MSNBC's website.

Lonnie Snowden, in an interview with NBC's "Today" show, said lawmakers were "complicit or negligent" in allowing the National Security Agency's massive electronic surveillance program to continue.

"I am extremely disappointed and angry," he said. "The American people - at this point, they don't know the full truth, but the truth is coming."

NBC polling showed that more than half of Americans are worried about the vast operation that sweeps up information on phone calls, emails and other communications, but just 11 percent support Edward Snowden's decision to flee the United States and release details about the effort to the media.

Lonnie Snowden said those findings show "a concerted effort" by lawmakers and Obama "to demonize my son, to focus the issue on my son, and not to talk about the fact that they had a responsibility to ensure that these programs were constitutional."

The US House of Representatives two days ago narrowly rejected a plan to limit the NSA's ability to collect electronic information, including phone call records.

About half of Americans support the data collection program while about 44 percent do not, according to a Pew Research Center poll released today.

'JUST LAUGHABLE'

Edward Snowden was working at the National Security Agency as a contractor from Booz Allen Hamilton before he released details about the spying programs to US and British media that were published in early June.

Russia has so far refused to hand over Snowden, who has remained in a Moscow airport since June 23, to the United States, and is considering a temporary asylum request.

Today, Russia said its officials and the FBI were discussing the matter, and the US Department of Justice said it had assured Russian counterparts that Snowden would not be tortured or face the death penalty if he was returned.

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"Wow that's a real concession, they won't torture him and send him to the guillotine," Bruce Fein, Lonnie Snowden's lawyer, told Reuters, adding that such assurances were "just laughable."

He also said he had not received a response from the Justice Department over an earlier letter outlining possible conditions for his client to return to the United States.

Lonnie Snowden told NBC he was confident in his son's actions.

"I believe that my son, when he takes his final breath whether it's today or 100 years from now, he will be comfortable with what he did because he did what he knew was right."

- Reuters

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