850 snakes found in suburban home

Last updated 16:11 20/09/2013
Snakes
Screengrab / News 12

Authorities gingerly handle the illegal Burmese Pythons found in the home in New York.

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An animal-control officer in New York has been found with 850 snakes in his home.

The man ran an illegal side business selling the snakes, with authorities reporting that the animals were worth half a million dollars.

The illegal haul included two illegal two-metre-long Burmese pythons.

"There is a reason why Burmese pythons are illegal," said Suffolk County SPCA Chief Roy Gross, citing the deaths of two young boys in New Brunswick, Canada, who were killed by an African rock python while they slept last month.

Gross said Burmese pythons can grow to nine metres long and are "an accident waiting to happen."

Richard Parrinello had worked on and off as an animal-control officer for the town of Brookhaven since 1988.

Authorities spotted the snakes during an investigation into whether Parrinello was working while on disability leave from his town job.

During a weeks-long undercover investigation, authorities said, investigators caught Parrinello on camera claiming he had $500,000 in inventory - including snakes, turtles and turtle eggs - stored in a garage he'd converted into habitat space.

Parrinello faces multiple charges of owning the pythons and violating town codes by running a business at his home without a permit. He was issued two violations by the state's Department of Environmental Conservation.

Authorities said Parrinello is cooperating. A man who answered the phone at a number listed on Parrinello's Snakeman's Exotics website said he had no comment.

Gross said the pythons were headed to an animal sanctuary in Massachusetts. It was unclear what would be done with the other snakes.

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- AP

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