Sandy Hook motive 'may never be known'

Last updated 09:54 26/11/2013
Sany hook

REMEMBERED: Artist Mark Panzarino prepares a memorial for the Sandy Hook Elementary School victims at Union Square in New York.

Sandy Hook
REUTERS
REMEMBERING: A boy leaves a teddy bear at a memorial for those killed in the massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Sandy Hook, Connecticut.
lanza stand
REUTERS
QUIET GUY: Classmates of Adam Lanza, 20, say the US gunman was the awkward kid who rarely spoke.

Related Links

28 dead in Connecticut school shooting Connecticut Shooting: Photos The heroics of Sandy Hook's teachers Sandy Hook children return to school NRA cold calls to Sandy Hook anger locals Sandy Hook demolition to help town heal Sandy Hook shooting game angers

Relevant offers

Americas

Canada votes for air strikes on IS Man who stole wedding ring off dying woman's finger gets 11-year sentence One dead, two hurt as pair tried to ram US spy agency NSA's gates 4-year-old takes 3 a.m. bus ride to buy slushie Man charged after 8-year-old shoots friend during game of cops and robbers Wife of millionaire Sydney podiatrist Phillip Vasyli charged with his murder in Bahamas Boston police officer cited for heroism after marathon bombing is shot Two bodies found at collapsed US buildings Air Canada flight slides off runway in Halifax 'Hazardous situation' in gas link before New York blast

The man who killed 26 people including 20 children in an attack on Sandy Hook Elementary School almost a year ago acted alone and his motive may never be known, investigators say.

A state attorney's report said that the criminal investigation into the shooting by 20-year-old Adam Lanza, who murdered his mother before attacking the school and ended the rampage by turning his gun on himself was now closed and no charges will be brought.

Investigators said there was evidence that Lanza planned his rampage, but did not discuss his plans with others.

"The obvious question that remains is: 'Why did the shooter murder twenty-seven people, including twenty children?' Unfortunately, that question may never be answered conclusively," the report said.

While the large informal memorials that arose in the Connecticut town of 27,000 residents in the days after the shooting have long been removed, small commemorations are sprinkled throughout the sprawling town.

Last year, on the morning of December 14, Lanza shot and killed his mother, Nancy Lanza, in her bed in their Newtown home, and then forced his way into Sandy Hook, which he once attended.

In a series of emails to Newtown parents last week, John Reed, the town's interim schools superintendent, addressed the report's release and cautioned parents to be mindful of their children's' emotional well-being.

"By supporting one another, we will work our way through these challenging circumstances," Reed said.

A Connecticut law passed earlier this year said that some evidence from the state's investigation would never be made available to the public.

The law, passed in response to the shooting, prohibits the release of photographs, film, video and other visual images showing a homicide victim if they can "reasonably be expected to constitute an unwarranted invasion of personal privacy of the victim or the victim's surviving family members." 

Ad Feedback

- AP

Special offers

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content