Man apologises for 1970s mugging

Last updated 08:30 03/12/2013
Michael Goodman says the memory of his bad deed had "sort of haunted me a bit throughout my life".
Claude Soffel has accepted his mugger's apology.

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A man who mugged a stranger 35 years ago has apologised on Facebook, after recognising his victim commenting on a random post.

Michael Goodman, now 53, was a teenager when he held up Claude Soffel for his bus pass in the late 1970s, on the steps of the American Museum of Natural History, the New York Post reported.

Goodman spotted Soffel's name in a Facebook post about a bagel store shutting down.

"You may not remember this ... but a long, long time ago I walked up the steps of [the museum] one afternoon, trying to look like a tough guy," Goodman posted

"I have never forgotten the incident or your name (it has sort of haunted me a bit throughout my life) & then here I am on fb. reading about my favorite bagel store in the world closing down.

"Finally I can say ~ I"M VERY SORRY that you had to go through that crap that day long ago, I wish it had never happened but it did."

He signed off by saying "peace and love to you my brother".

Soffel responded, saying clearly Goodman was a "bigger man" now. 

"Memory is a funny thing, I recognize your name now, as well," he wrote.

"So, apology accepted. Interestingly, I have dedicated a large portion of my life to helping other men be the man they have always wanted to be, and moments like this one continue to fuel my faith that the battle may be uphill but so rewarding."

He said any man who makes a big personal change was a hero to him, and they should now put the mugging behind them.

Goodman told the New York Post he mugged Soffel to impress a classmate who did not believe he was in a graffiti gang.

When he asked for Soffel's bus pass, the cops immediately arrested him.

He was taken to the police station, handcuffed, and sat there for about an hour before his father picked him up.

He was sentenced to three weeks of community service, cleaning up graffiti on the subway.

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For his next 20 years in New York, he tried to make up for bad karma, The Post reported.

- Fairfax Media


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