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Reports Colombian rebels killed with US help

Last updated 19:23 22/12/2013

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The Washington Post is reporting that a covert CIA programme has helped Colombia's government kill at least two dozen leaders of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, the rebel insurgency also known as FARC.

The Post says the National Security Agency has also provided ''substantial eavesdropping help'' to the Colombian government.

And the paper says the US provided Colombia with GPS equipment that can be used to transform regular munitions into ''smart bombs'' that can accurately home in on specific targets, even if they are located in dense jungles.

The Post report is based on interviews with more than 30 former and current US and Colombian officials, who spoke on condition of anonymity because the programme is classified and ongoing.

The CIA would not comment on the Post report.

Without going into detail, Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos told the Post that the CIA has been ''of help,'' providing Colombian forces with ''better training and knowledge.''

The multibillion-dollar programme was funded secretly and separately from $9 billion in aid that the US has openly provided to Colombia, mostly in military assistance.

It was authorised by President George W Bush and has continued under President Barack Obama, the newspaper reported.

Colombia’s government and FARC have been engaged in peace talks in Havana since late 2012, but there has been no ceasefire between the two sides.

Earlier this month Santos blamed the rebels for an attack on a police post that killed nine people, including civilians, military and a police officer.

The FARC rebels took up arms in 1964. The US-backed military buildup has reduced FARC’s ranks to about 9,000 fighters and killed several top commanders, though the rebels insist they are still a potent force.

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- AP

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