Honesty pays off for Las Vegas cabbie

Last updated 11:55 28/12/2013
Aouchon Gerard / YOUTUBE

A poker player who left US$300,000 in the back seat of a Las Vegas taxi has rewarded the driver's honesty.

Gerard Gamboa
HONESTY PAYS: A Las Vegas taxi driver has been rewarded for handing in $300,000 left in his cab.

Related Links

Honesty pays off for cabbie

Relevant offers

Americas

Republican Senator throws snowball to disprove climate change US jury convicts Osama bin Laden aide over 90s embassy bombings Llama pursuit goes down in the US US regulator FCC approves new Net Neutrality rules Internet generosity helps homeless man who helped motorists in snowstorm Saudi convicted over 1998 bombings of US embassies Top NYPD cop says IS threat is 'real' as three charged in plot Hillary Clinton signals different approach to gender in 2016 Marijuana legalised in Washington DC Boston Marathon bomber goes on trial

A poker player who left US$300,000 in the back seat of a Las Vegas taxi made good on his promise this week, handing over a US$10,000 reward to the honest cabbie who returned the stash.

Yellow Checker Star Cab Company CEO Bill Shranko confirmed that Gerardo Gamboa had been paid by the poker player.

The cab company also honored the driver's good deed by naming him employee of the year, awarding him US$1,000 and giving him a gift certificate to a Las Vegas steakhouse.

It's unclear how Gamboa plans to spend the belated Christmas gift.

The tale, first reported by the Las Vegas Review-Journal, started when Gamboa made a pickup at the Bellagio casino. A hotel doorman noticed a brown paper bag on the back seat and handed it to him; Gamboa thought it was candy.

The driver said he had another passenger by the time he began wondering what kind of chocolates were in the brown paper bag. He peeked inside at a traffic light and spotted the cash.

"I told my passenger, 'You are my witness on this,"' the taxi driver told the Las Vegas Sun, "and then I immediately called my dispatcher."

Gamboa took the six bundles of $100 bills to the company's main office, where Las Vegas police and casino officials linked it to the poker player.

It took several hours to verify the identity of the owner and return the cash. Authorities aren't identifying the poker player.

Before he learned about the anonymous gambler's gift, Gamboa said he wasn't in it for the money.

"If he doesn't give me anything, that's OK," Gamboa told the Sun earlier this week. "I'm not waiting for any kind of return. I just wanted to do the right thing, and I appreciate what the company did for me."

Ad Feedback

- AP

Special offers

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content