Victims remain in frozen, charred fire scene

ROB GILLIES
Last updated 08:39 25/01/2014
Quebec City fire
Reuters

ICE PALACE: Firefighters sort through the icy remains of a seniors' residence in Quebec City, a fire which killed five and left 30 unaccounted for.

Relevant offers

Americas

Mug shot of Texas governor Rick Perry released Students in alleged mass shooting plot were 'willing to die' Woman shoots grandson; thought he was an intruder Outsiders cop blame for Ferguson unrest Pope's relatives die in Argentina car crash Appeal for calm after more Ferguson arrests US bars airlines from flying over Syria National Guard deployed to quell riots Live: Protests in Ferguson, Missouri Police: Man killed 3-year-old daughter

 

Using steam to melt the ice, investigators searched the frozen-over ruins of a retirement home Friday for victims of a fire that left about 35 people feared dead and cast such a pall over the village of 1,500 that psychologists were sent door to door.

"People are in a state of shock," Quebec Minister of Social Services Veronique Hivon said.

The cause of the early-morning blaze Thursday was under investigation, and police asked the public for any videos or photos of the tragedy that might yield clues.

At least five people were killed and about 30 others were missing after the flames raced through the three-story building in below-zero cold. Canada's prime minister said there was little doubt the death toll would climb.

Witnesses told horrific tales of seeing people die. Most of the residents probably never had a chance to escape - many were over 85 and used wheelchairs or walkers.

Pascal Fillion, who lives near the senior citizens home, said he saw someone use a ladder to try to rescue a man cornered on his third-floor balcony. The man was crying out for help before he fell to the ground, engulfed in flames, Fillion said.

The spray from firefighters' hoses left the home resembling a macabre frozen palace, covered in white with sheets of ice and thick icicles.

Search teams of police, firefighters and coroners slowly and methodically went through the ruins, working in shifts in the extreme cold about 140 miles (225 kilometers) northeast of Quebec City.

Hivon said many of the village's volunteer firefighters had relatives at the retirement home. She said psychologists will be knocking on doors throughout the community.

"We want them to know the services are there by going door to door. It's an important building that's a part of their community that just disappeared," she said.

Hivon said the home was up to code and had a proper evacuation plan. A Quebec Health Department document indicates the home which has operated since 1997, had only a partial sprinkler system. The home expanded around 2002, and the sprinklers in the new part of the building triggered the alarm.

The minus-4 Fahrenheit (-20 Celsius) cold caused fire equipment to freeze, and firefighters used so much water that they drained the town reservoir.

About 20 residents of the retirement home were taken to safety.

Agnes Fraser's 82-year-old brother, Claude, was among the missing. She said she knew she would never see him again because he lived in the section of the building destroyed by the flames.

"It's done," Fraser said.

The fire came six months after 47 people were killed in the small town of Lac-Megantic, Quebec, when a train carrying oil derailed and exploded.

In 1969, a nursing home fire in the community of Notre-Dame-du-Lac, Quebec, claimed 54 lives.

Ad Feedback

- AP

Special offers

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content