MH370 search turns to Bay of Bengal

Last updated 16:44 03/05/2014

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Two Bangladeshi navy ships have begun searching the Bay of Bengal for traces of missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370, but have yet to find anything, the US news network CNN has reported.

According to CNN, the ships are operating off a tip from Australian company GeoResonance which claims to have found possible traces of an underwater airplane wreck in the area.

"We haven't found anything yet, and the frigates will continue the search until they verify all available information," Commodore Rashed Ali, director of Bangladeshi navy intelligence, told the network yesterday.

Malaysia’s acting Transport Minister Hishammuddin Hussein said he was also considering joining the search, despite remaining highly sceptical the missing plane will be found there.

Hussein said the tip could be confirmed only by sending vessels to the area, which is thousands of kilometres away from the official search area in the southern Indian Ocean.

"But I just want to stress that by doing that, we are distracting ourselves from the main search," Hussein said. "And in the event that the result from the search is negative, who is going to be responsible for that loss of time?"

The chief co-ordinator of the international search, Australian Admiral Angus Houston, has said he remains confident the aircraft crashed in the Indian ocean.

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- Fairfax Media

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