Trial for pregnant woman's stoning

Last updated 00:00 07/07/2014

Relevant offers

Asia

France confirms wing part found on Reunion Island from MH370 China puts on huge show of force at parade, to cut troop levels Bangkok bombing: warrants issued for 8, links to Turkey firm Pregnant woman bitten by shark in Thailand Tower of Hirosaki Castle moves a few dozen metres to the side Bali police see tourists as ATMs: 'kick them and they spit out money' Four months after quakes, Nepal fails to spend any donor money Thai police closer to cracking Bangkok bomb case Thailand arrests foreign suspect in Bangkok blast probe: Prime Minister Another explosion at chemical plant in China

The father of a pregnant Pakistani woman who was stoned to death and four other men have been charged with killing her after she married against the family's wishes and their trial was set to begin on Monday.

Farzana Parveen, 25, was killed May 27 before a crowd of onlookers near a downtown courthouse in the eastern city of Lahore. A mob beat her with bricks and killed her as she was on her way to court to contest an abduction case her family had filed against her husband.

A Pakistani court indicted her father, two brothers, a cousin and a man who claimed he had been married to Parveen on charges of murder and torture on Saturday.

All five men pleaded not guilty, according to Mian Zulfiqar, the police investigator.

The trial will begin on Monday when the court has called on prosecution witnesses to appear, said Zulfiqar. He said police and doctors who conducted the autopsy of the victim would be among those testifying.

"We have a strong case against the suspects but it is up to the court how to take view of our investigation," he said.

The case has brought international attention to violence against women in Muslim-majority Pakistan, where hundreds of women are killed by relatives each year in so-called "honor killings" carried out by husbands or relatives as a punishment for alleged adultery or other illicit sexual behavior.

Arranged marriages are the norm among conservative Pakistanis, and Parveen's family was angry she married Mohammed Iqbal for love.


Ad Feedback

- AP

Special offers

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content