Pakistan Taliban vows to avenge execution

Last updated 22:14 22/11/2012
Mohammad Ajmal Kasab
Reuters
EXECUTED: Mohammad Ajmal Kasab walks in the premises of the Chhatrapati Shivaji Terminus or Victoria Terminus railway station during the Mumbai attacks.

Relevant offers

Asia

Body of NZ man who dived off a cliff to try to save his swept away girlfriend in Bali found Australian man given suspended sentence, fined $200, over jet ski death South Korean ferry that sank 3 years ago lifted from sea Nearly $7000 raised to bring home Kiwi man missing in Indonesia US, Seoul vow to punish Kim Jong Un, North Korea after failed missile test Planes were trying to leave and land as the air traffic controller slept the day away Piggy Bank' turtle Omsin dies after good luck coins poison her blood The Whanganui River was the first in the world to be given human rights, now it's got some sacred company Family of Auckland man swept out to sea joins search for him in Indonesia Magnitude 5.5 earthquake hits near Denpasar, Bali

Pakistan's Taliban movement has threatened to attack Indian targets to avenge the country's execution of Mohammad Ajmal Kasab, the lone survivor of the militant squad responsible for a rampage through Mumbai that killed 166 people in 2008.

Kasab was hanged on Wednesday amid great secrecy, underscoring the political sensitivity of the November 26, 2008, massacre, which still casts a pall over relations between nuclear-armed rivals Pakistan and India.

"We have decided to target Indians to avenge the killing of Ajmal Kasab," said Taliban spokesman Ehsanullah Ehsan by telephone from an undisclosed location.

Ehsan demanded that India return Kasab's body.

"If they don't return his body to us or his family we will capture Indians and will not return their bodies," he said, adding that the Taliban will try to strike Indian targets "anywhere".

The Taliban, who are close to al Qaeda, are seen as one of the biggest security threats in Pakistan and are blamed for many of the suicide bombings across the country. They have not carried out major attacks abroad.

Kasab was charged with 86 offences, including murder and waging war against the Indian state, in a charge-sheet running to more than 11,000 pages.

It was the first time a capital sentence had been carried out in India since 2004. There was celebration on the streets of Mumbai and other cities as news of the execution spread, but militant groups in Pakistan reacted angrily, as did residents of his home village of Faridkot.

People set off fireworks and handed out sweets in Indian cities. Some held up photos of Kasab with a rope noose superimposed over his head.

Ad Feedback

- Reuters

Special offers

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content