Overloaded Malaysian ferry capsizes

Last updated 00:42 29/05/2013
A capsized boat floats in a river of Sungai Rajang in Belaga
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CAPSIZE: A capsized boat floats in a river of Sungai Rajang in Belaga in Malaysia's state of Sarawak on Borneo island in this picture taken by Belaga state assemblyman Liwan Lagang.

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An overloaded ferry has capsized after hitting rocks in a remote river in Malaysia's part of tropical Borneo island, leaving 21 people missing and feared trapped inside the vessel, police said.

Another 181 survivors swam ashore or were rescued by villagers.

The vessel was carrying nearly three times its recommended limit of 74 passengers, including many indigenous tribal palm oil and timber workers returning to their home villages for a harvest festival holiday, said Bakar Sibau, a district police chief in Malaysia's Sarawak state.

Police divers, fire department officers and villagers were searching for the missing passengers in the river, known for stretches of swift-flowing rapids.

"We believe some of them might still be trapped inside the boat," Bakar said, adding that the passengers included men, women and children.

Rom Kulleh, a political aide who flew in a helicopter over the river shortly after the accident, said he and his state legislator boss saw the overturned boat.

"We spotted some people being saved by villagers in smaller boats," Rom told the AP.

The accident occurred during a 130-kilometer (80-mile) journey that usually takes about three hours.

Rivers form the main transportation network for hundreds of thousands of people in sprawling Sarawak. Public concerns about safety, including the enforcement of rules for ferry capacity, have occasionally emerged, but major boat accidents in Sarawak are rare.

"Overcrowding is common, but everyone is used to it. We are very far away here from the enforcement officials," said Daniel Levoh, a district official familiar with transportation issues.

Borneo island is divided among three countries: Indonesian territory in the south, two Malaysian states in the north and tiny Brunei on the north coast.

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- AP

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