New strain of bird flu kills Chinese woman

Last updated 18:30 18/12/2013

Relevant offers

Asia

Indonesia to call off search for victims in deadly military plane crash Indonesian military plane crashes into houses in Medan Two dead after man sets himself alight on Japan bullet train At least 17 injured in attack on NATO troops in Kabul Small volcanic eruption closes parts of resort near Tokyo Antony de Malmanche sentenced to 15 years' prison on drug charge Mumbai train derails, jumps off tracks on to station platform Chinese hackers take up white hats, become internet gatekeepers Solar Impulse plane departs Japan, headed for Hawaii More than 500 injured in fire at Taiwan amusement park

A 73-year-old woman in China has died from a new strain of bird flu, the H10N8 virus, the Xinhua state news agency reported on Wednesday.

Xinhua cited unidentified experts as saying that the case in Nanchang, the capital of the landlocked southeastern province of Jiangxi, was an individual one and the virus had a low risk of spreading to humans.

The Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention had identified the strain as the H10N8 avian influenza virus, Xinhua said.

The Geneva-based World Health Organization (WHO) did not have any information about the virus on its website. A WHO spokeswoman said a statement would be issued later on Wednesday.

The woman died on December 6 due to respiratory failure and shock, Xinhua said. She had sought treatment at a hospital in late November.

She had visited a live poultry market and was exposed to the live poultry business, Xinhua said, adding that people who had had close contact with her had not exhibited any abnormal symptoms.

China is at the beginning of its traditional flu season, and has long had a problem with bird flu.

The H7N9 strain of bird flu emerged this year in China and has infected at least 139 people in China, Taiwan and Hong Kong, killing 45 of them.

Experts say there is no evidence of any easy or sustained human-to-human transmission of H7N9.

But a scientific analysis of probable transmission of the H7N9 virus from person to person, published in August, gave the strongest indication yet that it can at times jump between people and so could potentially cause a human pandemic.

Ad Feedback

- Reuters

Special offers

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content