Charity: Women, kids used as sex slaves

Last updated 14:52 27/02/2014

Relevant offers

Asia

Man faked identity to get Australian citizenship after stealing $21m and fleeing China, police say Indian heatwave toll at 1360 and rising World's largest Hindu temple to begin construction after Nepal quake delay 139 new species found in Greater Mekong in 2014 China puts weapons on its new artificial islands Chinese billionaire's son buys his dog two gold Apple Watches Wellington man Philip Blackwood to get Hurricanes present in Myanmar prison India heatwave kills hundreds China to extend military reach, build lighthouses in disputed waters Nepal moves to protect children from traffickers after quake

A New Zealand-based charity is helping free dozens of women and children from sex trafficking in South East Asia.

Former detective Daniel Walker is now chief executive director of Nvader, which last year rescued 40 women and children and helped prosecute 14 sex traffickers.

Former Hamilton man Justin Boswell is helping Walker train others to stop the exploitation.

"We have just partnered with Tear Fund who are helping with fundraising," Boswell, business director at Nvader, said.

He studied business at Waikato University and worked in management roles at RD1 and NDA Engineering.

"It's allowing us to focus on what we do."

Tear Fund will help raise support for Nvader in New Zealand and donations will be tax-deductible, allowing donors to get 33 per cent of their yearly contribution back.

"This year we have already rescued 22 women and children, children as young as five and six have been rescued."

Walker said there were more people. He estimated 27 million, with two million in the sex trade.

"Tear Fund were looking at moving into the anti-slavery area and it seemed like a no brainer for us to work with them.

"It's estimated organised crime makes US$32 billion from human trafficking."

Nvader has five full-time operatives working in South East Asia, supported by volunteers there and in New Zealand.

"We have got big goals, and we really want to make a big impact on this industry," Walker said.

"We want to cut it by 10 per cent in 10 years. It's more prevalent in developing countries. We go in behind the scenes where women and children are being raped for profit."

Walker hopes partnering with Tear Fund will raise about $2 million.

"Once we have got $2 million any extra funding will go to overseas offices. Over the next 10 years there will be offices opening in a number of different countries. We aim to rescue 200,000 women and children in the next 10 years.

Ad Feedback

- Waikato Times

Special offers

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content