Every North Korean votes for Kim

Last updated 08:27 11/03/2014
Kimg Jong Un
Reuters
LANDSLIDE VICTORY: Kim Jong Un has won North Korean elections with 100 per cent of the vote.

Relevant offers

Asia

$53m Kiwi pavilion for World Expo 2020 makes 'clear economic sense', Bridges says North Korea able to strike Australia 'within three years' Editorial: NZ is an impotent bystander as tension with North Korea esculates US citizen detained by North Korea named as Tony Kim Philippine president says he can be 50 times more brutal than terrorists North Korea says it's ready to strike and 'sink' US aircraft carrier Stolen plaque in Thailand a sign of antidemocratic sentiment Defence Minister Gerry Brownlee lashes out at North Korea's 'evil intent' Is NZ safe from North Korea's threat of nuclear war? Twenty-five million reasons the US hasn't struck North Korea

With no one else on the ballot, state media reports that supreme leader Kim Jong Un was not only elected to the highest legislative body in North Korea, he won with the unanimous approval of his district, which had 100 per cent turnout.

North Koreans went to the polls on Sunday (local time) to approve the new roster of deputies for the Supreme People's Assembly, the country's legislature. The vote, more a political ritual than an election by Western standards, is generally held once every five years.

Though results for the other seats in the assembly had not yet been announced, North Korea's media quickly reported Kim had won in his district - located on the symbolic Mount Paekdu - without a single dissenting ballot.

In the previous elections, 687 deputies were chosen. This is first time the election had been held since Kim inherited power after the death of his father, Kim Jong Il, in 2011.

"This is an expression of all the service personnel and people's absolute support and profound trust in supreme leader Kim Jong Un as they single-mindedly remain loyal to him," the state-run Korean Central News Agency said.

Voters in the election have no choice who to vote for - there is only one candidate's name on the ballot for each district. Instead, they have the choice of voting yes or no, and according to official accounts virtually all choose yes. North Korea also typically puts turnout nationwide at over 99 per cent.

"I will simply say that is not a model for democracy around the world," US State Department spokeswoman Jen Psaki said Monday  when asked about the election at a Washington news briefing.

But analysts will be closely watching to see if the deputies this time around reflect a generational change as Kim looks to solidify his power and replace older cadres with younger, more loyal ones.

The Supreme People's Assembly usually meets only rarely, often only once a year. In practice it has little power and when it is not in session, its work is done by a smaller and more powerful body called the Presidium.

The new parliament was expected to meet next month. No date has been officially announced.

Ad Feedback

- AP

Special offers

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content