Was MH370 spotted a week ago?

KATIE KENNY
Last updated 13:22 21/03/2014
MH370

SEARCH AREA: Updated charts for Friday's operation from the Australian Maritime Safety Authority.

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The saga begins on March 8, when Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 departs Kuala Lumpur at 12:41am, local time. On board are 227 passengers and 12 crew.

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A British satellite company says it suggested that missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 might have crashed off Australia more than a week ago.

Australia is leading a massive air and search operation in the Indian Ocean after revealing yesterday that two objects spotted on satellite images of the area might be linked to the passenger jet, which disappeared on March 8.

Latest leads estimate MH370 could be closer to the waters of Antarctica than to the Australian coast.

Global satellite network Inmarsat shared its data with a partner company the following day and with Malaysian investigators on March 12 ABC News reported .

However, it was a week before the search moved from the South China Sea and Malacca Straits to its focus now 2500 kilometres southwest of Perth.

Inmarsat spokesman Chris McLaughlin has defended Malaysian authorities, saying investigators were swamped by information.

"We can't possibly know what other data was in the investigation or what routes the Malaysian government were following," he said.

The Australian Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) this morning released a statement saying today's search will cover a 23,000 kilometre area.

Four planes - from Australia, America, and New Zealand - would be involved in today's search, with their departure times staggered throughout the day.

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