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Residents finally moving back to Fukushima

Last updated 19:15 01/04/2014
Japanese child
KIM KYUNG-HOON/ Reuters

LASTING IMPRESSION: Children were checked for signs of radiation in the aftermath of the Fukushima nuclear power plant disaster.

Fukushima
Tomohiro Ohsumi/ Reuters
The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant remains contaminated zone with radiation now found to have spread from the site by tuna.

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For the first time since Japan's nuclear disaster three years ago, authorities are allowing residents to return to live in their homes within a tiny part of a 20-kilometre no-go zone around the Fukushima plant.

The decision, which took effect Tuesday, applies to 357 people in 117 households from a corner of Tamura city after the government determined that radiation levels are low enough for habitation.

But many of those evacuees are still undecided about going back because of fears about radiation, especially its effect on children.  

Visits inside the zone had previously been allowed, and about 90 people already live in the area with special permission, according to Tamura city hall.  

The March 11, 2011, nuclear disaster, when a huge earthquake and ensuing tsunami led to meltdowns at the Fukushima Dai-ichi plant, displaced more than 100,000 people.

Many of them are still living in temporary housing or with relatives, and some have moved away to start life over elsewhere.

Areas within the evacuation zone have become ghost towns, overgrown with weeds.

Evacuees now receive government compensation of about 100,000 yen (NZ$1,200) each a month.

Those who move back get a one-time 900,000 yen (NZ$10,400) as an incentive.

The monthly compensation will end within a year for residents from areas where the government decides it is safe enough to go back and live.

New stores and public schools are planned to accommodate those who move back.  

''People want to go back and lead proper lives, a kind of life where they can feel their feet are on the ground,'' said Yutaro Aoki, a Tamura resident who works for a nonprofit organisation overseeing the city's recovery.  

The radioactive plume from the Fukushima plant did not spread evenly in a circle and so some areas outside the 20-kilometre zone are still too unsafe to live.  

Decontamination on an unprecedented scale is ongoing in Fukushima. Some places may not be safe to live for decades.

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- AP

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