MH370 Kiwi passenger's wife still hopeful

Last updated 15:36 30/05/2014
paul weeks
Facebook/Danica Weeks
HAPPIER TIMES: Paul and Danica Weeks.

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The wife of a New Zealand passenger onboard the missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 says she's still holding out hope despite all logic pointing to the plane never being found.

Danica Weeks - whose mechanical engineer husband, Paul, was onboard the flight on his way to start a new job in Mongolia - said she was still grappling with the news that the search area had been ruled out as the plane's final resting place.

"I don't know where to go from here," she said speaking from Australia.

"I'm just a wife trying to find her husband ... 77 days on, I still don't know where he is."

The Australian Transport Safety Bureau said on Thursday that the search in the zone of the acoustic detections had been completed and the area could be discounted as the final resting place of MH370.

Weeks said she felt like she had been given false hope because search authorities had been so confident that the pings were their best lead.

The mother of two said she had been preparing for a memorial as they were searching the area, believing it was just a matter of time before they found the wreckage.

"To completely disregard it entirely was just like ripping my heart out," she said.

Weeks said people kept telling her to explain the truth about what happened to her husband to their sons Lincoln, 3, and 13-month-old Jack.

"I'm telling Lincoln the truth that dad isn't coming back and it wasn't his choice," she said.

"He's obviously emotional about that."

But Weeks said it was hard to explain what happened to the youngsters because she had not even reconciled the truth herself.

"I still have the slight piece of hope," she said.

"I know logically it sounds ridiculous, but how can you not when you have nothing to go on?"

Weeks said she remained haunted by the loss of the love of her life and best friend, and said she could not yet think about taking any legal action against the airline.

Having earlier narrowed down the search area based on the pings, the Australian-led search was now casting its net much wider, but is still following an arc defined by British company Inmarsat based on the final "handshakes" between the Boeing 777 and satellites.

A new, potentially deeper underwater search will begin in August and could take up to a year.

MH370 went missing on March 8 enroute from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing with 239 people onboard.

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- WA Today

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