Sydney collar-bomb suspect gives up extradition fight

NICO MILLER
Last updated 08:05 15/09/2011
Paul Peters is escorted from the Federal Courthouse in Louisville, Kentucky.
AP
ARRESTED: Paul Peters is escorted from the Federal Courthouse in Louisville, Kentucky.
Madeleine Pulver
Sydney Morning Herald
VICTIM: Madeleine Pulver was trapped inside her Sydney home.

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Paul Peters, the man accused of placing a fake collar-bomb around the neck of Sydney schoolgirl Madeleine Pulver, expects to be back in Australia within a week to fight the charges.

Mr Peters, 50, appeared early this morning (NZ time) in a court in Louisville, Kentucky, and waived his right to fight extradition.

Dressed in a striped jail uniform and sandals, Mr Peters was asked by the US District Court judge if he understood the rights he was giving up, and if he understood the extradition law.

He replied "yes, indeed".

His ex-wife, at whose Kentucky home he was arrested in an FBI operation last month, attended the hearing but declined to comment to the media afterwards.

Outside the court Mr Peters' lawyer, Thomas Clay, said he expected his client to return to Australia within a week.

He had waived the extradition rights because he wanted to get back to Australia and deal with the charges - and also because extradition is almost always granted, Mr Cox said.

Mr Peters will return to custody in Kentucky until he is collected by Australian police.

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- Sydney Morning Herald

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