'Hot core' keeps Australia baking

Last updated 07:07 11/01/2013
Cyclone Narelle
BRETT MARTIN/Perth Weather Live

Nature's wrath ... a spectacular gust front associated with cyclone Narelle was captured about 25 nautical miles north-west of Onslow in Western Australia on Wednesday. The red tinge results from dust picked up from the Pilbara.

Ku-Ring-Gai
REUTERS Zoom
A fire burns in Ku-Ring-Gai National Park, north of Sydney.

Australian firefighters battle to contain blazes

Relevant offers

Australia

Fuel pump fault causes Qantas plane to turn back Sheep shearing, nuts for royals in Oz Royals visit bushfire devastated town Royals next stop: Australia Maori protest historic medal's sale Kiwi fridges invade Aussie shores Chloe Campbell snatched to 'scare father' Weakened Ita brings torrential rain Police injured as siege ends in explosion MH370 search: Co-pilot made call

It is the heatwave that won't go away.

Even cyclone Narelle, wandering off the north-west coast of Western Australia, has so far failed to budge the giant heat cell over the continent.

"The system is holding its shape," said the manager of climate monitoring at the weather bureau, Karl Braganza. "You are still getting the hot core over the inland."

But the core is stretching eastward again, sending the mercury higher for populated regions ranging from Victoria to Queensland.

Sea breezes are forecast to keep the temperatures in Sydney to peaks of 33 and 34 degrees Celsius on Friday and Saturday, according to the latest forecasts. But move inland to Bankstown and days of 41 and 39 await.

Melbourne can expect 37 on Friday before a cool change arrives and keeps temperatures down for a week.

NSW and Victoria have declared total fire bans for Friday. The better news is that the weather pattern looks to be less threatening than earlier in the week.

''Winds are not expected to be as strong as last Tuesday's,'' said Julie Evans, a senior meteorologist at the bureau.

Records, meanwhile, continue to fall. Leonora in central Western Australia claimed the temperature peak for the fortnight-long heatwave, notching 49 degrees on Wednesday.

The remote town had broken its previous record just a day earlier at 48.3. The 47.8 level reached on Monday matched a high that had stood for about 55 years.

Weatherzone, owned by Fairfax Media, predicts several towns from Birdsville to Moomba will come close to 50 degrees in coming days.

This week the bureau drew international attention after it added extra colour to its forecast charts to extend the range to 54 degrees.

The first eight days of 2013 made it into the top 20 hottest days for Australia in more than a century and the massive heat dome over the continent shows little sign of moving on.

Ad Feedback

- © Fairfax NZ News

Special offers

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content