Pot-laced muffins allegedly served at office party

MARISSA CALLIGEROS
Last updated 14:57 12/02/2013

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For some it would be the ultimate office farewell gift.

A worker at a Queensland employment agency allegedly took a tray of marijuana-laced muffins to a farewell party for a colleague, who had accepted a redundancy, last week.

The 42-year-old woman, who had also taken a voluntary redundancy, allegedly took the home-baked treats to the office morning tea held for her colleague last Wednesday at the Noosa branch of Employment Services Queensland.

Within hours of the morning tea for the company's departing site manager, the woman's co-workers started falling ill.

One woman, who collapsed and fell unconscious, was taken by ambulance to hospital.

It is believed her severe reaction may have been complicated by other medical conditions.

Another woman rushed to see her GP, suffering from nausea.

Employment Services Queensland general manager Chris Hamilton said a number of staff members became unwell after eating the muffins.

"They progressively became more unwell over a period of hours," Mr Hamilton said.

"Obviously the [muffins] were nice enough that people had a couple each. The lady who was hospitalised had two I believe, so she probably ingested enough substance to make her quite unwell."

Mr Hamilton said office morning teas would continue at the agency despite the concerning incident.

"You could be very risk adverse about this, but if you look at the likelihood of something occurring like this in the future it's very, very low," he said.

"While the consequence is significant, the overall risk assessment is that providing that we put word out to all staff about being careful about what you put in your tucker when you bring it in, that's about all we can do.

"Otherwise you would be jumping at shadows."

Mr Hamilton said about 10 employees had accepted voluntary redundancies from the agency on the Sunshine Coast.

The 42-year-old woman has been charged with one count of supplying and possessing a dangerous drug.

She is due to face Noosa Magistrates Court on March 12.

Police investigations are continuing.

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- Brisbane Times

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