Royal baby emails no bundle of joy

BEN GRUBB
Last updated 14:04 26/07/2013
Princess Kate, George Alexander Louis, Prince William
Reuters
BY GEORGE: The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge with their newborn son, to be known as His Royal Highness Prince George of Cambridge, on the steps of the hospital.

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Security experts are warning people to be cautious of malicious software circulating via email around news of the royal baby.

Australian security firm Trend Micro said it had spotted one particular type of message disguised as news containing a link to malicious software, or malware, related to the birth and that users should not click it.

If clicked and a user does not have appropriate anti-virus protection, it installs the malware, called Zbot, which can steal data including online logins for banks.

"These messages appear to be from ScribbleLive, a service that provides real-time engagement platforms," Trend Micro's anti-spam research engineer Cyril Coronado wrote on the firm's security blog.

"The offer, of course, is false, and clicking on links in the email will only trigger multiple redirections that are typical among Blackhole exploit kit (BHEK) spam runs."

Coronado said the speed at which the malicious emails were sent was "remarkable" considering they started to appear only half a day after the official announcement of the birth.

Sanjay Mehta, managing director of Trend Micro in Australia, said the malware used was old "but still well alive" due to its update and morphing mechanisms.

He added that Trend Micro's statistics showed Australia was so far one of three countries that most accessed the infected website that contained the malware.

Ten per cent of Trend Micro customers around the world that clicked on the link were from Australia, but were protected from infection.

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- Sydney Morning Herald

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