Australian skydiver with more than 10,000 jumps dies in 'extremely rare' accident

Sydney Skydivers instructor Adrian Lloyd, 60, was killed in the accident.
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Sydney Skydivers instructor Adrian Lloyd, 60, was killed in the accident.

Two men killed during a tandem skydiving lesson in Australia on Saturday have been named as investigators try to determine the cause of the "extremely rare" fatal accident.

The 60-year-old instructor was Adrian Lloyd, an experienced skydiver with more than 10,000 jumps in his 30-year career.

His pupil, 29-year-old Singaporean national Low Ke Wei, also known as Mario, had just moved to Sydney for work in early June.

29-year-old Singaporean national Mario Low Ke Wei was killed in the skydiving accident on Saturday.
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29-year-old Singaporean national Mario Low Ke Wei was killed in the skydiving accident on Saturday.

Low's sister, Angeline, said she would remember Mario for "his love for deep sea fishing". 

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The pair took off from Sydney Skydivers in southwest Sydney but crashed onto the driveway of a rural property on Wilton Rd, about a kilometre from the designated landing site.

All skydives on Sunday were cancelled out of respect for the two men.

The skydiving company released a statement on Facebook saying the skydive "was not especially challenging".

"The particular skydive the two men were undertaking was not especially challenging for a highly experienced instructor, who had done nearly 10,000 skydives and had nearly 30 years experience in the sport," Sydney Skydivers said.

"Our sympathies go out to the families and friends of both men as well as those in our skydiving community.

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"We are doing our best to ensure any support is provided to our staff, skydivers and those involved at the scene itself."

Investigators are still examining what led to the accident.

The Australian Parachute Federation is also helping with the investigation.

"We're looking into all possibilities, whether it's equipment failure or perhaps human error," Australian Parachute Federation spokesman Brad Turner told Australia's 7 News.

Sydney Skydivers said the accident was "extremely rare".

"This is the first fatality involving a first orientation tandem skydive the company has had in over 40 years of operation," the statement said.

A spokesman said more information would be released once police and safety officers from the Australian Parachute Federation finished their investigations.

Colombian tourist Catalina Granados jumped minutes before the fatal accident happened.

She was with her boyfriend, who booked the skydive as a gift for the couple to experience together.

She said she wasn't told of the fatality until hours after it happened.

"They didn't tell us when it happened, they made us wait around three hours and they told us what happened when were were back in Sydney," Granados said.

"After we changed our clothes, all the instructors were called to go somewhere else ... but we didn't know anything."

Another skydiver, Dustin Leonard, told News Corp Australia he was on his way to sign up for a second jump scheduled for Saturday afternoon when he was told some skydivers had landed far away from the scheduled area.

"I don't think anyone knew something bad had happened," he said.

"I think it's just tragic. It's just a fluke accident."

- Sydney Morning Herald, AAP

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