Bodies of Noelene and Yvana Bischoff arrive home

Last updated 11:00 11/01/2014
Noelene Bischoff
SUDDEN DEATHS: Yvana Jeana Yuri Bischoff and her mother Noelene Bischoff.

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The bodies of the Queensland mother and her daughter who died in mysterious circumstances in Bali last week have returned home.

Noelene Bischoff, 54, and her daughter Yvana, 14, died within hours of each other last Saturday morning at the start of their two-week holiday.

After a week of wrangling between Indonesian and Australian authorities, their bodies were finally released from the Sanglah Hospital morgue yesterday afternoon.

Virgin Australia flight VA4198 from Denpasar in Bali landed in Brisbane at 5.09am local time (6.09am AEDT), ending a week of uncertainty for the Sunshine Coast-based Bischoff family.

No one from the family was at Brisbane Airport.

But shortly after the plane landed, Ms Bischoff's brother, Malcolm, said getting them home was an important step.

"We're really relieved to have them back here," he said.

Indonesian investigators had intended to perform autopsies on the Bischoffs in Bali, but eventually ceded to the family's wishes for them to be performed in Australia.

"I suppose it's a bit more on our terms now. There's been a lot of uncertainty dealing with the Indonesian authorities, though (the Indonesian people) have been great," Mr Bishcoff said.

"When they were over there (in Bali), it was all on their terms."

Mr Bischoff said he hoped to have some answers about why his sister and niece died so unexpectedly.

The next step, he said, was a funeral. Although the timing of that was still uncertain.

"As soon as (the autopsy) is done, and we have more clarity," Mr Bischoff said.

"We don't know how long it takes."

Mr Bischoff said there were "too many people" to thank for the logistical operation that saw the bodies returned.

"To everyone that's been involved in the past 12 hours, I'd just like to say thank you," he said.

"It's not just a plane - it's hundreds of people."

Virgin Australia flew Ms Bischoff and Yvana were flown back to Australia free of charge.

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- Sydney Morning Herald

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