Green light to kill sharks

Last updated 05:00 21/01/2014

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The Western Australian government will go ahead with its controversial catch and kill policy for large sharks, despite threats from opponents prompting a professional fishing outfit to pull out.

The state government will instead use its fisheries department to patrol metropolitan waters.

The government originally wanted professional fishermen to bait and monitor drum lines off Perth's coast by January 10.

However, Fisheries Minister Ken Baston confirmed on Monday that threats had been made to the tenderer and himself by people opposed to the plan, which was instituted in response to another fatal shark attack off the South West coast in November.

The company had pulled out, Mr Baston said.

The Department of Fisheries would not be needed in the South West, where a private contractor's tender had been accepted, he said.

The contractor is expected to start putting out drum lines in coming days.

Mr Baston also said the federal government had approved the plan to kill great white sharks - a protected species - more than three metres in length that lurked too close to beach-goers.

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