Bid to extend shark cull

Last updated 19:52 08/04/2014
Great White Shark

New rules have been announced for the shark diving industry.

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The Western Australian government has moved to extend its controversial shark cull trial by three years.

The state government has applied to the commonwealth to set up 72 baited drumlines one kilometre off the metropolitan and  southwest coast between November 15 and April 30 for three years,  starting this year.

The continuation of the programme would see any bull, tiger or great white shark bigger than three metres caught on baited drumlines shot dead and dumped further out at sea, and would be reviewed in 2017.

The number of static drumlines in the water will not exceed 60 at a time, with 12 drumlines kept in reserve to respond to a shark threat or incident.

The applications comes as Fisheries crews are trying to catch and kill a four-metre great white shark that has been swimming  close to several Perth beaches on Tuesday.

A spokesman told AAP that extra drumlines had been set up at Swanbourne beach and could remain in place for up to an hour to catch and destroy the animal.

Surf Life Saving WA said was it was the first seen 200m off Trigg beach, before moving 400m off Scarborough beach, and then moving to City Beach and Floreat.

Each beach was closed while the shark swam through.

Drumlines have so far caught at least 104 sharks, including 101 tiger sharks, with 40 either found dead or destroyed, according to  figures released last month.

Sea Shepherd recently failed in its bid to secure a Supreme Court injunction to force the state government to suspend the cull.

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