Last bodies pulled from mine in Turkey

Last updated 08:21 18/05/2014
Reuters

As final bodies are pulled from Turkish mine the death tolls now stands at 301 for the country's worst industrial disaster ever. Deborah Lutterbeck reports.

Turkey
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GRIEF-STRICKEN: Women mourn during the funeral of a miner who died in a fire at a coal mine, at a cemetery in Soma.

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Turkish rescue workers have retrieved the bodies of the last two missing miners in the nation's worst mining disaster, putting the final death toll at 301, the energy minister says.

Taner Yildiz said 485 miners escaped or were rescued after the explosion and fire on Tuesday (local time) that devastated the coal mine in Soma, western Turkey.

"All corners of the mine were searched by a large team and there was no other body or living person," he said. "Until today we had focused on search and rescue efforts. Now we will be focusing on investigations, on what will happen about production."

"We won't be leaving (Soma) because the search efforts are ending," he added. "There will be psychological and social support."

Government and mining officials have insisted that the disaster was not due to negligence and that the mine was inspected regularly. Akin Celik, the mine's operations manager, has said thick smoke from the underground fire killed many miners who had no gas masks. High levels of carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide have been a problem for rescue workers as well.

But one miner, 24-year-old Erdal Bicak, told The Associated Press that he believes the disaster was due to the mining company's negligence.

"The company is guilty," Bicak said. He said managers had machines that measure methane gas levels: "The new gas levels had gotten too high and they didn't tell us in time."

Yildiz said it is too early to say why the explosion occurred.

"The true cause of the accident will be assessed ... through different dimensions," he said. "There will be lessons to draw for the mining world."

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- AP

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