Prince William is more popular than the Queen

Last updated 01:00 16/06/2014
William and Kate
Reuters
FUTURE KING: Britain's Prince William and Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge.

Relevant offers

Europe

Giant gold coin worth millions stolen from Berlin museum Dream job - provider of soft furnishings and curtains to the Queen US tourist killed in London would not have borne ill feelings towards attacker - family Russian protest leader, Putin critic Alexei Navalny gets 15 days in jail Queen's Guard loses it after tourist busts out dad dance moves outside palace Jeremy Corbyn accused of trying to sabotage Brexit Police rule out terror as car driven into revellers outside London pub British couple killed by carbon monoxide after car modifications Muslim women form human chain across Westminster Bridge in show of solidarity with terror victims Pope's sex abuse board vows to go on without survivor member

Prince William is Britain's most popular royal and is regarded more favourably by the public than either Queen Elizabeth, his grandmother, or Prince Charles, his father and heir to the throne, a poll showed on Sunday.

The poll, by ComRes for The Independent on Sunday newspaper, canvassed more than 2,000 Britons and showed that Britain's royals are more popular than any of the country's politicians, including Conservative Prime Minister David Cameron.

Sixty-eight percent of those asked said they had a favourable view of Prince William, 63 percent of the Queen, 43 percent of Prince Charles, and 28 percent of Cameron, the country's most popular political party leader.

The poll, which was conducted on June 11-13, was not the first time that Prince William has been identified as the most popular royal.

His wife Kate gave birth to a baby son last year amid a global media frenzy, boosting the couple's profile.

The survey's overall result confirms previous polling which suggests that the popularity of the British monarchy is at its highest level in decades.

The Queen, 88, is in good health and has been on the throne since 1952.

If she decides to step down, as Spain's King Juan Carlos did earlier this month, Prince Charles, her 65-year-old son, is next-in-line for the throne.

Prince William, 31, is third-in-line. 

Ad Feedback

- Reuters

Special offers

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content