Crackdown on Gallipoli ticket scalping

Last updated 18:30 26/06/2014

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You can sell pretty much anything on eBay - but not tickets to Anzac Day centenary commemoration at Gallipoli.

Online auction site eBay has promised the Australian government ballot tickets won't end up on the site, following concerns scalpers might try to profit from the event.

The ballot for tickets was competitive, with more than 43,000 people vying for one of 3000 double passes allocated to the Australian public. About 2000 New Zealanders were given tickets to the centenary event.

The Australian government wants to make sure only those involved in the ballot get to attend the 2015 event.

''It will not be possible to sell these tickets, it will not be possible to transfer these tickets,'' Defence Minister David Johnston told parliament on Thursday.

Anyone arriving at the site will have to confirm their identity.

Just over 100 nominated people have opted not to attend the commemoration and their tickets will be reallocated.

The dawn service at Anzac Cove will mark 100 years since the fateful Gallipoli landing on April 25, 1915.

Ticket holders have to foot their own bill and make their own arrangements to travel to Turkey.

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- AAP

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