Sudanese woman sentenced to death meets Pope

Last updated 09:13 25/07/2014
VATICAN TV

Pope Francis blesses Mariam Ibrahim, who was sentenced to death in Sudan for becoming a Christian.

Mariam Ibrahim
Reuters
HOLY TOUCH: Pope Francis blesses Mariam Ibrahim and her baby during a private meeting at the Vatican.
Mariam Ibrahim
Reuters
PHOTO TIME: Ibrahim is heading to the US with her husband, Daniel Wani, and their two children.

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A Sudanese woman who refused to recant her Christian faith in the face of a death sentence has been blessed by the Pope, as she cradled her infant daughter born just weeks ago in prison.

The Vatican characterised the visit with Mariam Ibrahim, 27, her husband and their two small children as "very affectionate."

The 30-minute encounter took place just hours after the family landed at Rome's Ciampino airport, accompanied by an Italian diplomat who helped negotiate her release, and welcomed by Italy's premier, who hailed it as a "day of celebration."

Vatican spokesman the Reverend Federico Lombardi said the pope "thanked her for her faith and courage, and she thanked him for his prayer and solidarity." The Pope frequently calls attention to the suffering of those persecuted for their religious beliefs.

Lombardi said the presence of "their wonderful small children" added to the affectionate tone of the meeting. Video footage released by the Vatican shows the pope giving the family papal medals and rosaries.

Ibrahim held her sleeping infant as she stepped off the plane from Sudan, which had initially blocked her from leaving the country even after the country's highest court overturned her death sentence in June.

An Italian diplomat carried her 18-month-old son, while her husband, Daniel Wani, who is disabled, joined them on the tarmac in a wheelchair.

Ibrahim and her family were expected to spend a few days in Rome before heading to the United States, where her husband is a citizen.

Ibrahim, whose father was Muslim but whose mother was an Orthodox Christian from Ethiopia, was sentenced to death over charges of apostasy. She married Wani, a Christian from southern Sudan, in a church ceremony in 2011.

As in many Muslim nations, Muslim women in Sudan are prohibited from marrying non-Muslims, though Muslim men can marry outside their faith.

The sentence, issued in May, received global condemnation including from the United Nations and Amnesty International, and both the US and Italy - a strong death penalty opponent with long ties to the Horn of Africa region - worked to win her release.

Sudan's high court threw out her death sentence in June, but she was then blocked from leaving the country by authorities who questioned the validity of her travel documents.

Lapo Pistelli, an Italian diplomat who accompanied the family from Sudan, said Italy was able to leverage its ties within the region.

"We had the patience to speak to everyone in a friendly way. This paid off in the end," he said.

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- AP

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