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Monkey selfie dispute put to the vote

Last updated 09:50 08/08/2014
Sydney Morning Herald

A monkey's cheeky self portrait is in the heart of a legal battle over copyright claims.

monkey selfie
WHO'S A PRETTY BOY?: The self-portrait as it appears on the Wiki Commons site.

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A standoff over a cheeky monkey's jungle selfie will be decided by the people.

Wikimedia planned to ask its users to vote on whether it should remove photos of a monkey in the Indonesian jungle that British photographer David Slater says were being used without his permission.

Slater has taken legal action against Wikimedia for publishing and sharing the photos, which were taken by a crested black macaque who snatched Slater's camera while he was photographing the endangered primates in 2011.

Wikimedia has refused to remove the images, arguing the photos were taken by a non-human animal and therefore not subject to copyright.

The photos, which show the monkey pulling faces from gleeful to coy, made it onto the Wikimedia Commons site, which has a collection images and video files which are free to download.

Wikimedia said members of its community would decide if the photos should remain in the public domain, in a case The Telegraph said could spark a row over photographers' rights.

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