Mass killer Anders Behring Breivik's NZ link

LAURA WESTBROOK
Last updated 18:38 27/07/2011
Anders Breivik
Reuters
IN CUSTODY: Norwegian Anders Behring Breivik (L), the man accused of a killing spree and bomb attack in Norway.

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Norwegian mass killer Anders Behring Breivik praised a speech given in New Zealand by an Australian historian in his 1500 page manifesto.

Breivik wrote that Keith Windschuttle "is tired of that anti-Western slant that permeates academia".

"For the past three decades and more, many of the leading opinion makers in our universities, the media and the arts have regarded Western culture as, at best, something to be ashamed of, or at worst, something to be opposed," he quoted Windschuttle as saying.

The Quadrant magazine editor hasn’t denied that his speech was heavily quoted.

"Breivik quotes several statements I made in a paper to a conference in New Zealand in February 2006, titled The Adversary Culture: The Perverse Anti-Westernism of the Cultural Elite,'' Windschuttle told The Australian newspaper.

The speech was delivered at the Summer Sounds Symposium, at Punga Cove in the Marlborough Sounds, on February 11, 2006.

Windschuttle told The Australian that this was a "truncated version'' of his paper "but it is not inaccurate or misleading''.

"I made every one of these statements and I still stand by them,'' he said.

 "Having read them several times again, I am still at a complete loss to find any connection between them and the disgusting and cowardly actions of Breivik,'' he said.

He added it would be a "disturbing accusation'' if people thought that he had ever used deliberately provocative language that might have caused Breivik to take up a rifle and shoot unarmed teenagers in cold blood.

The symposiums were founded in 1997 by author Agnes-Mary (Amy) Brooke, and gatherings of academics, journalists, MPs, and business leaders were held annually in the Marlborough Sounds for a decade. The most recent was held near Nelson, in March last year.

Before Breivik was arrested, he had sent out a manifesto to some 5700 contacts.

The document, grandly titled “2083- A European Declaration of Independence” and circulated under the pseudonym Andrew Berwick, offered a sketch of every extremist White Power fantasies current among such groups.

It also quoted several other Australians approvingly, including former prime minister John Howard, former Treasurer Peter Costello, and Catholic Cardinal George Pell.

Howard is labelled "one of the most sensible leaders in the Western world".

Costello is cited on page 520 for calling on Muslim leaders to denounce terrorism and for advising Islamic migrants to adopt Australian values, but has dismissed the manifesto as "deluded rantings".

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Breivik is expected to face charges over the mass murder of mainly teenagers. He detonated a bomb in Oslo that killed eight people and gunned down at 68, mainly young people, at a holiday camp at the weekend.

- Stuff

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