Pussy Riot members flee Russia

Last updated 08:10 27/08/2012
Pussy Riot
REUTERS

SPEAKING OUT: An activist holds a poster depicting Russian President Vladimir Putin in support of members of the female punk band Pussy Riot during a protest rally at the Venceslas Square in Prague.

Pussy Riot
REUTERS
SUPPORTIVE: Activists in Warsaw wear masks in support of the female punk band.

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Two members of the punk band Pussy Riot have fled Russia to avoid prosecution for a protest against Vladimir Putin that sent three of their band mates to prison, the group says.

Five members of the feminist group took part in a provocative performance inside Moscow's main cathedral in February to protest the Russian leader's rule and his cozy relationship with the Orthodox Church. The women wore their trademark garishly coloured balaclavas, which made it difficult for police to identify them, and only three were arrested.

After a controversial trial that highlighted Putin's crackdown on dissent since he began a third presidential term in May, the three band members were convicted of hooliganism and sentenced to two years in prison on August 17. Days later, Moscow police said they were searching for the other band members, an apparent warning to the group to stop its anti-Putin protests.

Even as the judge was reading the verdict in a Moscow courtroom, one of the band members who had escaped arrest played Pussy Riot's latest song, Putin sets the fires of revolutions, from the balcony of an apartment building across the street.

Pussy Riot tweeted yesterday the two activists had fled Russia and are "recruiting foreign feminists to prepare new protest actions". No mention was made of where they went.

At least 12 other members of the group remain in Russia, another message on Twitter said.

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- AP

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