Queen's Olympic star corgi dies

Last updated 07:38 10/09/2012
All Black Andrew Mehrtens introduces young teammate Regan King to one of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II corgies at an afternoon tea for the team at Buckingham Palace in November 2002.
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ROYAL INTRODUCTION: All Black Andrew Mehrtens introduces young teammate Regan King to one of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II corgis at an afternoon tea for the team at Buckingham Palace in November 2002.

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One of the Queen's corgis, which featured in the James Bond skit at the London Olympic opening ceremony, has died, Buckingham Palace has confirmed.

Monty, 13, who originally belonged to the Queen Mother, died over the weekend, the Daily Mail reported.

Monty had a starring role in the Bond skit performed by the Queen and actor Daniel Craig when he, along with corgis Holly and Willow, ran down the stairs to greet Craig and escort him to meet the Queen.

They performed a series of belly rolls, and escorted the pair to their helicopter where a Queen look-a-like took over.

The breed has been associated with the Windsors since 1933, when the future George VI bought his first pembroke corgi.

Monty was named after Monty Roberts, the American subject of a BBC documentary, A Real Horse Whisperer, according to the Sunday Times.

Roberts, 77, who advises the Queen on horses and corgis, has reportedly offered her a corgi puppy to carry on the tradition, reported the Daily Mail.

Monty was part of the pack which attacked Princess Beatrice's dog Max last month.

The 11-year-old terrier nearly lost an ear and suffered several gruesome bites.

The palace also confirmed the death of Cider, a dorgi, or dachshund-corgi cross-breed. It is not known exactly how they died, although it is believed to be natural causes. Two other dorgis, Candy and Vulcan, remain.

Fairfax NZ

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