Once-flooded Spanish villages and archaeological sites emerge as reservoirs dry up video

Previously only peaks of the remains were visible in the drier summer months.
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Previously only peaks of the remains were visible in the drier summer months.

A seven-month long drought in the north-west regions of Spain has revealed the remains of several villages and archaeological sites.

Water levels had dipped in a man-made lake in the region of Galicia, which was flooded in 1967 to improve water supplies, uncovering walls, pillars, stone lintels and even lampposts.

On occasion the peaks of buildings had been visible in the drier summer months, but locals were unclear just how much was still intact until now.

A combination of the driest summer in Galicia since 1981 and a 40 per cent drop in autumn rainfall had seen the Belesar reservoir fall to 25 per cent capacity, and allowed crowds of curious visitors to walk on the remains and wander through the narrow lanes.

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Visitors can now walk on the remains for the first time since the area was flooded.
CONCELLO DE CHANTADA

Visitors can now walk on the remains for the first time since the area was flooded.

The old village of Portomarin, which was submerged when the Mino River was dammed to help source water for a hydroelectric power plant, had emerged unscathed with its bridge, lanes and cemetery appearing from the depths.

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A drier autumn and hot summer contributed to the receding water levels.
CONCELLO DE CHANTADA

A drier autumn and hot summer contributed to the receding water levels.

 - Stuff

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