Russia test-fires missile

Last updated 09:00 05/03/2014

Relevant offers

Europe

Russian town turns into block of ice 'Meditating' mummy found in Mongolia Typo brings down 120-year-old company Taylor & Sons New Zealander who forecast D-day landings has died Alexis Tsipras names anti-austerity Greek cabinet Dead ex-KGB spy pointed finger at Vladimir Putin How Greece's triumphant leftists want to change Europe NATO blames Russia for Ukraine violence Auschwitz survivors ask if lessons have been learnt Ten killed in Greek fighter plane crash in Spain

Russia says it has successfully test-fired an Intercontinental Ballistic Missile (ICBM), with tensions high over its seizure of control in the Crimea and its threat to send more forces to its neighbour Ukraine.

The Strategic Rocket Forces launched an RS-12M Topol missile from the southerly Astrakhan region and the dummy warhead hit its target at a proving ground in Kazakhstan, Defence Ministry spokesman Igor Yegorov told state-run news agency RIA.

The launch site, Kapustin Yar, is near the Volga River about 450km (280 miles) east of the Ukrainian border. Kazakhstan, a Russian ally in a post-Soviet security grouping, is further to the east.

A US official said the United States had received proper notification from Russia ahead of the test and that the initial notification pre-dated the crisis in Crimea.

Russia conducts test launches of its ICBMs fairly frequently and often announces the results, a practice seen as intended to remind the West of Moscow's nuclear might and reassure Russians that President Vladimir Putin will protect them.

Russia and the United States signed the latest of a series of treaties restricting the numbers of ICBMs in 2010, but Moscow has indicated it will agree further cuts in the near future and is taking steps to upgrade its nuclear arsenal.

Putin has emphasised that Russia must maintain a strong nuclear deterrent, in part because of an anti-missile shield the United States is building in Europe which Moscow says could undermine its security.

The 20-metre (60-foot) long RS-12M, known in NATO parlance as the SS-25 Sickle, was first put in service in 1985, six years before the collapse of the Soviet Union, and is designed to carry a nuclear warhead. Its range is 10,500 km (6000 miles).

Ad Feedback

- Reuters

Special offers

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content