Journalists captured, shot in Syria

Last updated 14:31 15/05/2014

Relevant offers

Middle East

Iran seeks give and take Syrian Kurds flee Islamic State into Turkey Turkish hostages freed after 3 months Rift widens between Obama, US military over strategy to fight Islamic State Islamic State has offered to trade hostages for imprisoned 'superstar' Islamic militants blamed for Baghdad bombings France carries out air strikes in Iraq on Islamists Iranians punished for lip-synching to US pop song 'Happy' Islamic State seizes 21 villages in Syria US Senate approves aid to Syrian rebels

Two London Times journalists covering the Syrian civil war were kidnapped by a ''rebel gang'' and one of them was shot before members of an anti-extremist rebel group intervened and secured their release, the Times reported.

Reporter Anthony Loyd was shot twice in the leg while being held captive, and photographer Jack Hill suffered a severe beating after trying to escape, it said.

The two, who had spent several days covering the restive city of Aleppo for the Times, were released on Wednesday (local time) after local commanders of the group Islamic Front intervened.

They later crossed into Turkey, the paper said.

Loyd and Hill were kidnapped earlier in the day along with a local guide while heading from the northern Syrian town of Tall Rifat to Turkey after a ''rebel gang'' intercepted the vehicle in which they were traveling, the newspaper reported.

They were driven back to Tall Rifat, where they were held in a warehouse, guarded by the men who had been leading them to the border.

Hill and the guide made an attempt to escape after overpowering one of the guards.

The guide managed to escape on a stolen moped, but Hill was recaptured and was severely beaten along with Loyd, the paper said.

Loyd, who earlier this year won the Foreign Reporter of the Year award from the Society of Editors for exposing the use of chemical warfare in Syria, was shot in the legs to prevent him from escaping, it was reported.

After their rescue by the Islamic Front, which was formed in December to counter al Qaeda-linked rebel groups, they received medical treatment locally before crossing into Turkey, it said.

Sixty-three journalists have been confirmed killed while working in Syria since 1992, according to figures available on the website of the non-profit Committee to Protect Journalists.   

Ad Feedback

- Reuters

Special offers

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content