Jews and Arabs refuse to be enemies

ERYK BAGSHAW
Last updated 11:15 24/07/2014
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UNITED: A Jewish and a Palestinian boy together in Israel for #JewsAndArabsRefusetoBeEnemies

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As Egypt attempts to broker an extended ceasefire in Gaza after weeks of fighting that has resulted in more than 620 deaths, some Israelis and Palestinians are taking to social media to show their desire for an end to the bloodiest conflict between the two warring sides in 15 years. 

Israelis and Palestinians of all ages are posting photos of themselves with messages that project beauty, hope and despair. 

There are photos of Jews and Palestinians kissing over the Israel-Gaza West Bank barrier, Orthodox Jewish men carrying Palestinian boys on their shoulder and children on both sides of the conflict uniting through friendship. 

One young woman concerned by the war summed up the internal conflict of many people in the region. 

The hash tag #JewsandArabsRefuseToBeEnemies was spawned by a photo taken by Arab-American journalist Sulome Anderson, kissing her Jewish boyfriend, Jeremy. 

The trend has spread around the world, with concerned Palestinians and Jews uniting in Paris, Berlin and New York. 

The UN Human Rights Council has condemned the Israeli assault on Gaza, describing it as a "disproportionate and indiscriminate attack."

It has launched a probe into alleged Israeli war crimes. 

With Israeli and US encouragement, Egypt has tried to get both sides to hold fire and negotiate terms for an extended period of calm in Gaza

The Eid al-Fitr festival, which follows the end of Ramadan this weekend, could provide all sides with a moment to agree to a ceasefire.

- Sydney Morning Herald

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