Video: Men dig toddler from rubble in Syria

Last updated 07:42 28/01/2014

Amateur video purports to show Syrians rescuing a toddler from a pile of rubble in Aleppo.

Relevant offers

Middle East

Islamic State militants are kidnapping thousands of people to use as human shields Experts uncover hidden layers of Jesus' tomb site Jesus Christ's supposed ‘burial slab’ has been uncovered for first time in centuries NZ Fire Service to train Syria's 'White Helmets' civil defence volunteers US-backed Iraqi forces Iraqis press toward under-seige Mosul Iraq bans alcohol with surprise law change, politicians unaware they voted for it Pictures of two young Egyptian children engaged to be married spark outrage Jewish settlers invite Palestinians over for the holidays to try for some bonding Australian soccer coach kidnapped in Yemen Islamic State said to use Mosul residents as human shields as coalition closes in

In a world weary of images of misery out of another trouble zone, will video of the dramatic rescue of a buried Syrian toddler make you stop and look?

The child, buried alive in rubble and dirt after his home was destroyed in an explosion in Syria, was dug out by men using their bare hands.

Dramatic video of the rescue was posted online, reportedly by Nour.Media.Center activists in Aleppo on January 22.

President Bashar Assad’s army is accused of destroying the building in which the child's family lived, in the Almasranih neighbourhood of Aleppo in Syria.

About a dozen men worked together, searching for the right spot to dig. They could apparently hear the baby.

The child appears shocked but well after he is pulled from the ground. He blinks slowly and shields his eyes from the bright sunlight.

The crowd cheers and shouts of "Allahu akbar" - "God is great" when the child is finally freed.

Watch full video here:

Meanwhile, the first meeting meant to discuss the contentious issue of a Syrian transitional government broke up less than an hour after it began overnight following a tense session that one delegate described as "a dialogue of the deaf."

The Syrian government has said it will not discuss replacing Assad as the leader of a country his family has ruled since 1970.

The opposition insists he must step down in favour of a transitional governing body with full executive powers that would lead the country until elections are held.

The UN envoy, Lakhdar Brahimi, managed to get both sides to sit in the same room over the weekend to discuss humanitarian aid to besieged areas of the besieged central city of Homs and a possible prisoner exchange. But the opposition said little progress has been achieved.

On Sunday, after three days of talks, a tentative agreement was reached about the evacuation of women and children trapped in Homs before aid convoys go in, although as of Monday night there had been no progress on the ground.

- Fairfax NZ, AP

Ad Feedback
Special offers

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content