Images of destruction from Cyclone Pam-ravaged Vanuatu gallery video

Lawrence Smith/Fairfax NZ

Port Vila residents speak about their destroyed homes and belongings after Cyclone Pam ravaged the region this past weekend

On the Vanuatu island of Tanna and in the capital of Port Vila, Cyclone Pam's destruction is plain to see.

More than 80 per cent of homes and other buildings on Tanna have been partially or completely destroyed.

The destruction on Tanna was significantly worse than in the nation's capital of Port Vila, where Pam destroyed or damaged 90 per cent of the buildings.

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Vanuatu begins the slow recovery process after the devastation of cyclone Pam.

Inside Port Vila hospital.

Vanuatu begins the slow recovery process after the devastation of cyclone Pam.

Stranded Kiwi holidaymakers pictured at Port Vila airport waiting for a commercial flight out.

Inside Port Vila hospital.

Inside Port Vila hospital.

Stranded Kiwi holidaymakers pictured at Port Vila airport waiting for a commercial flight out. Mike Keagan pictured was evacuated from Tana island earlier in the day.

Vanuatu begins the slow recovery process after the devastation of cyclone Pam.

Vanuatu begins the slow recovery process after the devastation of cyclone Pam.

New Zealanders are evacuated from Port Vila back to Auckland on a RNZAF C-130 Hercules aircraft.

Vanuatu military personnel prepare aid for distribution at Port Vila airport.

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TANNA: A TWISTED WASTELAND OF BROWNS AND GREYS

Tanna was once a verdant paradise.

Now it's now a twisted wasteland of browns and grey, blacked-out and broken by Cyclone Pam.

Reuters

International aid reaches some of the remote islands in Vanuatu that have been devastated by a monster cyclone.

Islanders are still largely cut off from the world five days after the eye wall of the category five storm shredded through.

The entire landscape has been shorn of trees. Those still standing look like their branches have been sawn off.

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An aerial view of the destruction of a resort after Cyclone Pam struck on Tanna Island, Vanuatu.

People walk through a street in Lenakel town after Cyclone Pam in Tanna,Vanuatu.

A girl picks fruits from a tree at Lenakel town in Tanna, Vanuatu.

Blankets are laid out to dry after Cyclone Pam in Tanna, Vanuatu.

A man passes a destroyed house after Cyclone Pam struck in Lenakel, Tanna, Vanuatu.

People wash their clothes on the beach at Lenakel town in Tanna,Vanuatu.

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Eight people have been confirmed dead on Tanna, which has a population of over 35,000, but counting continues. 

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The official count doesn't include those killed indirectly by the cyclone. The overall official death toll for Vanuatu was 11 on Wednesday morning, but is expected to rise.

The most recent was 20-year-old local man Eddy Willy, who died of an unknown illness because both Lenakel and Port Villa hospitals were damaged by the storm and unable to treat him.

LAWRENCE SMITH/Fairfax NZ

Port Vila hospital is dealing with an influx of patients and lack of human resource amid structural damage after the devastation of cyclone Pam.

Family and neighbours from his home village of Ituga wailed, screamed and clawed at his coffin when a ute brought in his body from the airport.

Just down the road, local police officer John Maeke says two women - one aged in her 50s, the other older than 70 - died when they were crushed by the brick wall of their house.

Officer Meake says another man was crushed to death by a falling tree limb when he tried to rescue his mother, who also died when she was struck by a piece of corrugated iron roofing.

A local villager who was injured when hit by masonry when a shipping container broke through a concrete wall.
Fairfax NZ

A local villager who was injured when hit by masonry when a shipping container broke through a concrete wall.

"There was nothing anyone could do, no one has seen a storm like this," he told AAP.

"This is the worst storm of our generation, no one remembers anything worse."

Lishie Rossie, who works for Australian charity Live and Learn, said Pam probably hadn't finished killing people.

All medical facilities on Tanna are closed and the local government has advised all patients, no matter what their emergency, to stay home.

"There is no way to treat anyone, Tanna no longer has a hospital," Lishie said.

Only bore water is drinkable, flowing water sources are far too contaminated.

Even though locals stockpiled some food, he said they will soon start running out.

"We need to get them food, time is running out," Lishie said.

Police officer Eddy Are said police were handing out emergency rations right up until the moment Pam crossed Tanna's coast.

Entire villages were evacuated into schools and other strong buildings, but many were ripped apart by the storm.

Officer Are says as the cyclone roared right over them, police raced back to their barracks to take cover.

"We just sat there for hours, listening to this bad, dark sound," he said.

"All of us are homeless now," he sighed.

Lishie said many villages on the southern side of Tanna, and on outer islands like Erromango and Futuna, are yet to even make contact.

The provincial government has sent teams on foot to assess the damage in southern Tanna, but they were yet to return to the provincial capital on Tuesday, two days after they set off.

Many Tanna locals said they feel forgotten by the world because they focus seems to be on Port Villa and towns on the main island of Efate.

Until more help arrives the days will remain hungry and nights pitch black on Tanna.

Meanwhile, New Zealand's air force hopes to resume its relief flights after two planes had to return to Auckland – both because of instrument problems.

Eighty-two New Zealanders who had approached the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade for assistance were brought home by C-130 Hercules late on Monday. But others remain missing.

The family of elderly Christchurch missionaries have not heard from the couple since Tropical Cyclone Pam devastated the island at the weekend.

 - AAP

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