Local boards advocating for better transport and creating community hubs

Improved transport links and cleaner waterways is a focus for some of Auckland's local boards.
SIMON MAUDE/FAIRFAX NZ

Improved transport links and cleaner waterways is a focus for some of Auckland's local boards.

Better transport links, vibrant community hubs and investment in parks and open spaces are all a priority for Auckland's central local boards.

Albert-Eden, Puketapapa, Waitemata, Maungakiekie-Tamaki and Orakei local boards are all seeking feedback on their draft local board plan, which includes projects and focus areas for the next three years.

Despite every local board in the central region extending over different suburbs and populations, their draft plans for the next three years have a similar focus.

The uncertain future of the Mt Albert Aquatic Centre will be included in the Albert-Eden local board draft plan.
SUPPLIED

The uncertain future of the Mt Albert Aquatic Centre will be included in the Albert-Eden local board draft plan.

Developed every three years, local board plans set the direction and the priorities local boards will focus on.

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Albert-Eden's key focus areas will be to secure the future of the Mt Albert Aquatic Centre, implementation of the Chamberlain Park Masterplan and ensuring town centres and local economies thrive.

Pueketapapa local board needs to plan for around 1500 new homes to be built in the area.
SUPPLIED

Pueketapapa local board needs to plan for around 1500 new homes to be built in the area.

hair Peter Haynes said during the next term the future of the aquatic centre would be a priority.

"It's no secret the pool will have to move from its location at Mt Albert Grammar School, and we need the community to understand the issue, and we do everything they can so we can keep a pool in Mt Albert."

Pueketapapa's focus area for the next term would be the implementation of the Three Kings Plaza Masterplan.

The plaza needs an upgrade to prepare for the Three Kings Quarry housing development adding 1500 new homes to the area.

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The board is also looking at continuing work on parks and focussing on efficient transport choices including advocating for light rail.

Chair Harry Doig said the recent agreement for the Three Kings Quarry highlighted the importance of the the plan.

"We need to think about future growth, and how intensification can be integrated successfully," he said.

Waitemata local board chair Pippa Coom said it was important community members had their say on the plans.

The board planned to continue work towards creating healthy, connected, vibrant and inclusive communities.

"The board wants to provide spaces such as parks, community facilities and recreation centres that are welcoming and accessible for our diverse communities."

Transport, accessibility and safety are common threads throughout the plan.

The board is seeking feedback on proposals such as introducing more slow speed zones in residential areas and improving public transport infrastructure.

Orakei Local Board also has a focus on community facilities and public places.

"We will investigate different concepts and funding options to ensure we get fit-for-purpose community spaces," the plan said.

Another key focus for the board was the natural environment and developing a local healthy waters action plan for the Orakei Basin and Tamaki Estuary.

Local board chair Colin Davis said increasing transport options in the area was also a priority.

"We want to complete major projects, such as linkages to the Glen Innes to Tamaki Drive Shared Path and extending the cycling and walking network," he said.

The focus of the Maungakiekie-Tamaki Local Board for the next three years is collaboration. 

The board wants to work with other organisations and prepare for growth and redevelopment of the ward, ensuring upgrades to infrastructure to deal with an influx in new residents. 

Looking after the environment and cleaning up waterways is also a major focus for the board. 

University of Auckland's school of architecture and planning senior lecturer Elizabeth Aitken-Rose said it was important for the public to have a say. 

"Local boards provide the local connection that used to be provided by council," she said.

Aitken-Rose said boards were a way of connecting those in the community interested in local affairs.

"Local boards have money and they're an effective part of the apparatus overall."

She said citizens were able to have an active voice and hold board's to account.

"You can lobby your local board about what is going on with the libraries to your rubbish collection."

Go to shapeauckland.co.nz to view the local board plans in full and have your say before June 30. 

After consultation closes on June 30, the local boards will review all feedback and use it to help shape the final local board plans. The final plans will be adopted by October 2017.

 - Stuff

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