Fairies aim to bring the magic of nature to life

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Fairies believe in spirits

Osher Oriyah and Kashmir Postel are starting a fairy service on Waiheke Island that flows from a belief in the spirits of nature.

Oriyah grew up in worn-torn Israel and said the "grey energy" of war shaped her into a depressed, cynical teenager.

News that her grandfather was dying pushed her further down while she was serving two years compulsory military service at the age of about 17.

Waiheke Island fairies Kashmir Postel and Osher Oriyah hope to bring joy and environmental awareness to children.
ROSE DAVIS/STUFF
Waiheke Island fairies Kashmir Postel and Osher Oriyah hope to bring joy and environmental awareness to children.

However, she had a sudden glimpse of "infinite joy and infinite peace" and felt there was something bigger and more magical in the world.

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She decided she wanted to "bring more love to children" and started a Bachelor of Arts in education and English.

Delighting in their fairy roles - Osher Oriyah and Kashmir Postel
ROSE DAVIS/STUFF
Delighting in their fairy roles - Osher Oriyah and Kashmir Postel

At the age of 26, she moved to the United States, where she completed a Master of Arts in expressive arts therapies.

She became a dance therapist who includes the wisdom she learned from Native American medicine women in her work.

"The Native American women showed me a whole different way of looking at nature and myself.

Fairies Osher Oriyah and Kashmir Postel at Oneroa Beach.
ROSE DAVIS/STUFF
Fairies Osher Oriyah and Kashmir Postel at Oneroa Beach.

"The fairy idea came years later, when the elementals started to talk to me and remind me of my fairy nature.

"I could see the flower fairies and hear their singing and I started to sing their songs," she said.

While the idea of bringing the joy of fairies to children might sound airy fairy to some, for Oriyah it is "down to earth".

"When you look into flowers that grow in nature, they have fairy energy, points of light, whatever you call them.

"I see the points of light in my inner vision and it's always joyful," she said.

She wrote a children's book, The Butterfly Child, which was published in 2010 and delves into the magic the natural world offers.

The 46-year-old met 24-year-old Postel, who grew up on Waiheke Island, at Prana Festival on Coromandel peninsula and a match made in fairy heaven was born.

For Postel, fairies are "an essence of the beauty in nature".

"When you're connected to the wind and the different elements, you're more connected to yourself and you care for the environment better," Postel said.

She learned about theatre as therapy and as a tool for social change while gaining a Bachelor of Arts in theatre performance.

Postel started a non-profit organisation, Seed of Light Collective, and directed a puppet show that she toured around Indonesia earlier this year to raise awareness of environmental issues.

"My quest for this life is to raise consciousness and awareness around the environment through performance.

"It's so important in today's society to remind children of the huge importance of what the natural environment brings to us as human beings.

"Nature gives us so much and we give very little back," Postel said.

The pair is launching Fairy Magic Waiheke, offering story telling, treasure hunts and games at birthday parties, weddings and other celebrations.

The service is adaptable, can include environmentally friendly gifts, and is "not just for the rich", Postel said.

"It's great to have fairies at any age because it opens everyone's heart and reminds them of their essence," Oriyah said.

For more information, email naturedance777@gmail.com.

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