Irish music warms up a wintry Taranaki night.

An Deise is a trio made of some of Ireland's top traditional musicians; Paddy Tutty, Derek Morrissey and Caoimhin O ...
SIMON O'CONNOR/STUFF

An Deise is a trio made of some of Ireland's top traditional musicians; Paddy Tutty, Derek Morrissey and Caoimhin O Fearghail performed on Saturday night.

An Deise with special guest Roesy. 
Crystal Palace, New Plymouth.
Saturday 7.30pm.
Reviewed by Catherine Groenestein.

 

A feast of Ireland's music - from toe-tapping traditional instrumental melodies to poetry in song - came to the Crystal Palace on Saturday.

Ireland's An Deise got their audience dancing to ceili music on Saturday.
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Ireland's An Deise got their audience dancing to ceili music on Saturday.

The intimate setting made for a house concert atmosphere, a little crowded and full of bonhomie, a cosy setting on a drizzly, wintry New Plymouth evening.

The audience was expecting a good night with four of Ireland's top musicians, and they weren't disappointed.
 
Singer songwriter Roesy's music is often like poetry in song.
Supplied

Singer songwriter Roesy's music is often like poetry in song.

The combination of An Deise (Derek Morrissey in addition to Paddy Tutty who plays fiddle and bodhran - an Irish frame drum, and Caoimhin O Fearghail on guitar, vocals, flute and uilleann pipes, or bagpipes.) with their guest, singer songwriter Roesy - contrasted in style most satisfyingly.
 
Roesy began the hour-long gig with a selection of his contemporary original numbers, some philosophical songs more like poetry, interspersed with jauntier numbers, and all delivered in a strong voice with a charming accent, sweetened with humour and banter in between.
 
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An Deise took the stage at a gentler pace, starting with a range of skilful traditional reels and jigs, some with names, others where the name had been lost, but all with that toe-tapping, hand-clapping energy.
 
Each instrument got a chance to shine, including a set of borrowed Irish bagpipes played by Caoimhin O Fearghail, who quipped his task was 'like trying to strangle an octopus',  although it certainly sounded way more pleasant than that.
 
A hint of what lay ahead came when Irish dancer Charlotte burst out from the wings and energetically stamped and tapped her way through one particularly energetic number.
 
"I bet you weren't expecting that," Morrissey commented as she whirled off the stage.
 
The hour-long concert ended too soon, but more fun was to come.
 
Chairs were cleared off part of the floor to make space for dancing, and after a noisy, chatter-filled interlude, Charlotte and An Deise returned to teach the braver among their audience, how to dance a ceili.

 - Stuff

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