Sir Peter Jackson's Beatles doco will be 'more expressive' than original, Ringo Starr says

The Beatles' iconic concert on the rooftop of the Apple Corps' Savile Row London office could have been a whole different moment in a completely different setting.
GETTY
The Beatles' iconic concert on the rooftop of the Apple Corps' Savile Row London office could have been a whole different moment in a completely different setting.

The Beatles' fans will know of the band's iconic rooftop concert. But they don't know the whole story, according to drummer Sir Ringo Starr.

Starr spoke about the upcoming documentary Let It Be, created by Kiwi filmmaker Sir Peter Jackson, saying this one will be "more expressive and more like we were", rather than focusing on arguments within the group like the original 1970 documentary did.

In a video posted to SiriusXM, Starr explained how he and Jackson have been reviewing some of the footage that wasn't used in the band's original documentary.

"Prior to us doing that [the rooftop concert], we're all hanging out, and it's a lot of fun, lot of humour, and not like the one [the documentary] that came out."

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"There was a lot of joy and I think Peter [Jackson] will show that."

In a video posted to SiriusXM, Ringo Starr explained how he and Kiwi filmmaker Peter Jackson have been reviewing some of the footage that wasn't used in The Beatles' original documentary.
Screenshot/Facebook
In a video posted to SiriusXM, Ringo Starr explained how he and Kiwi filmmaker Peter Jackson have been reviewing some of the footage that wasn't used in The Beatles' original documentary.

Jackson's untitled film will use 55 hours of unreleased footage of the iconic band, originally shot between January 2 and January 31, 1969. One-hundred-and-forty hours of audio will also be used to create the film.

The remake was previously described by Jackson as "the ultimate 'fly on the wall' experience that Beatles' fans have long dreamt about".

Kiwi director Peter Jackson is working with Apple Corps on The Beatles film.
GETTY
Kiwi director Peter Jackson is working with Apple Corps on The Beatles film.

Starr explained the pair are excited about the project and the footage, with Jackson working to present an accurate representation of the band and what they were like.

"He was showing me bits because he felt similar to me that the other version was a bit down. There was no need for it to be down.

"Michael Lindsay-Hogg [the director of the 1970s documentary] took one point of view - little moments - and built the whole thing around that."

He also commented on the fact that Lindsay-Hogg featured in the film "quite a lot".

The Beatles
The Beatles "rehearsing, recording, rapping, relaxing, philosophising, creating, live" in a motion picture.

But the iconic concert on the rooftop of the Apple Corps' Savile Row London office could have been a whole different moment in a completely different setting.

"We had great discussions about going to Hawaii in a crater, or the pyramids to do it.. Mount Everest."

The idea to host the concert on the roof came about so simply.

"And then, 'Ah, sod it. Let's just do it on the roof.' That's how that came about," he said in the clip posted to SiriusXM's Facebook page.

He also spoke about his willingness to play live, and how footage of the band's discussion was never included in the original film.

Ringo Starr says Peter Jackson's documentary remake will show the band "more expressive and more like we were".
Getty Images
Ringo Starr says Peter Jackson's documentary remake will show the band "more expressive and more like we were".

"Paul [McCartney] says, 'Well, who wants to play live?' And I'm the only one. I go, 'I do'."

Wellington's Park Road Post is working to restore the footage using techniques used for Jackson's WW1 film, They Shall Not Grow Old.

"I was relieved to discover the reality is very different to the myth. After reviewing all the footage and audio that Michael Lindsay-Hogg shot 18 months before they broke up, it's simply an amazing historical treasure-trove," Jackson previously said.

The documentary is being made with the co-operation of Sir Paul McCartney, Sir Ringo Starr, Yoko Ono Lennon and Olivia Harrison. A release date is yet to be announced.

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